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16151  - ``SPENCER RIFLE VALUE``
2/25/2020
Gerald Englehart

Maker: Spencer, Model: 7 Shot Repeating Rifle, Caliber: 52. 50., Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Other, SN: ?

Markings:
none

Question:
Are these desirable for collectors ? Mine is in good condition. Value?

Answer:
Gerald- Yes, Spencers are desirable collector items. However it is impossible to even guess at the value of your gun. We ask about the barrel length so we can figure out if a gun was a carbine or a rifle, or may be cut down. There should be markings on the flat top of the receiver which would identify the maker, and help narrow down the date and model. Spencers were made in three military calibers- originally .56-56; later .56-52 and lastly .56-50. Some Spencers were used in the Civil War, others during the Indian War period, and some were purchased post war. Circa 1870 Springfield Armory even converted 1,000 Spencer cavalry carbines into infantry rifles. Values will differ for all of those, and of course, depend a great deal on the condition. John Spangler



16214  - FEG (Fegyvergyan) PMK .380
2/25/2020
Cesar, Aransas Pass, TX. USA, mariam@sat.net

Maker: FEG, Model: PMK .380, Caliber: .380, Barrel Length: 4¨, Finish: Blue, SN: HC6XXX

Question:
I'm told this is a very reliable Walther replica. Upon close inspection ofthe barrel it doesn't seem very thick. Will this gun handle +P+ ammunition?Or will it bend, warp, and blow up in my hand??? Thanx a million. :)

Answer:
Cesar, FEG is a manufacturer located in Hungry (FEG stands for Fegyvergyan). FEG has manufactured firearms since the turn of the century. The model PMK (patterned after the Walther PP) was imported in 1992 and 1993. FEG is currently being imported by KBI Inc. located in St. Albans, Vt. Unfortunately, due to liability concerns we cannot answer your question. Try having a competent gunsmith in your area check out your PMK or contact KBI directly... Marc



16213  - Modele 1935S
2/22/2020
Floyd

Maker: M.A.C, Model: Modele 1935S M1, Caliber: 7.65L, Barrel Length: 3", Finish: Blue Steel, SN: MAC-B 15XXX

Question:
Trying to find out more about this gun. I believe it is the same caliber as a 30 Luger, and is a military issue but know little about the gun and want to find out more.

Answer:
Floyd, After the first world war, the French decided that they wanted to equip their armed forces with a new semi-automatic pistol. Various manufacturers were contacted and designers at the government Saint Etienne arsenal began work on a semi-auto design. Numerous designs were tested, and eventually, a model developed by the Societe Alsacienne de Constructions Mecanique (SCAM) was selected to enter service as the Me 1935. The Me 1935 was a modification of the Browning swinging-link system, the principal difference was that the firing lock was in a separate, removable, unit. The Me 1935 pistol had a well-shaped butt, a reliable action, and it was exceedingly well made. The safety catch was a simple half-round shaft on the end of the slide which, when rotated, prevented the hammer from striking the firing pin. Unfortunately the Me 1935 was designed for the anemic 7.65mm Longue cartridge (not the .30 Luger) which propelled an 87-gr bullet at 1100ft/sec to give only 233ft/lb of muzzle energy, this was very poor performance for a military cartridge of the day. With war looming in 1938, Saint Etienne re-designed the Me 1935 to make it easier to mass-produce. The basic mechanical features remained the same, but the lines became more angular, and the finish was of lower quality. The locking of barrel and slide was changed from the original Browning type ribs, to a simple lug on the barrel locking into a single recess in the slide. Various modifications were also made to the lockwork to make it easier to produce. In order to distinguish between the older and newer models, the original SACM-made version became the Me 1935A, and the war production model, became the Me 1935S. Before many 1935S pistols had been produced, WWII began and France was occupied by the Nazis. It is reported that 1935S production continued under the German occupation, but only Me 1935A pistols have been noted with German acceptance markings. Marc



16136  - MARKINGS ON KRAG RIFLE
2/22/2020
Robert, Haughton, la

Maker: ?, Model: 30 40 Krag, Caliber: 30 40, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: 4264

Markings:
There are numbers at the top of the rifle that read 165R2225 but they are exed out.

Question:
What do these numbers mean.

Answer:
Robert- I am pretty sure that the ``165R2225`` is not a military marking. AT first glance it looks like a tire size, but I am sure it is not that either. It is probably someone`s driver`s license number. Back in the 1960s-80s, there was a program called ``Operation Identification`` where police would loan people electric engraving pencils to mark their driver`s license number on various items. The idea was that if it was stolen, the owner could reclaim it if their number was on it, or if a crook tried to pawn it, the pawn shop would say ``Hey, this ain`t your license number, it must be stolen.`` I don`t know how good this was as a crime fighting measure, but it sure messed up a lot of old items, including some guns. John Spangler



16132  - UNKNOWN 70mm ARTILLERY SHELL
2/18/2020
Jason, North Smithfield, RI

Maker: Unknown Artillery Shell, Model: ?, Caliber: 70m/m HE, Barrel Length: NA, Finish: Other, SN: NA

Markings:
On the base of the shell: 70M/M H.E. P.E.W. 1915 and then a symbol below that looks like a British pound symbol. Also a lightly struck script M or W depending on which way you think is up. There are no markings on the fuse or shell diameter. Approx 13'' long. Steel body with solid beveled base. Single driving band. Nose unscrews and shell has apparently long been been emptied of whatever charge and fuse it contained.

Question:
I was just asked to identify an inert artillery shell (projectile) without any brass case and cannot find any information online. I see lots of 75mm sized projectiles but nothing of 70mm. HE is high explosive and I`m assuming 1915 is the year. The pound like stamp makes me think British but I can`t find anything online. I have pictures I can email if you want to see them. I`m hoping you guys won`t be stumped like I am. You previously answered a question for me on a 3''50 naval shell back in 1999. Thank you, Jason

Answer:
Jason- Sorry, I cannot help with that one. The markings certainly sound English (or American) but I cannot match this with anything. Your best bet would be to post photos and measurements on the International Ammunition Association forum at https://forum.cartridgecollectors.org/latest. Someone from there will probably be able to make a positive ID for you.

(We are proud to note that the OldGuns.net guys set up the first version of this very useful information source for the IAA.) John Spangler




16216  - Webley .455 Mark VI Revolver Date Of Manufacture
2/18/2020
Carins

Maker: Webley, Model: Mark VI, Caliber: .455, Barrel Length: 5 '', Finish: Blue, SN: 392349

Markings:
Double arrows toward each other with a D and an arrow inside it.

Question:
What is the date of manufacture

Answer:
Carins, .455 caliber Webley revolvers were used by the British armed forces for 60 years. The Mark I Webley was adopted in November 1887, and the last of the Webley service revolvers (the No. 1 Mark VI) was declared obsolete in 1947. All Webley service revolvers were of a similar top-breaking design with a heavy stirrup type catch. All of the Webley service revolvers have a ``birds head`` type grip except for the Mark VI whose grip is square. The Mark VI (called No.1 Mark VI after 1927), was adopted in May 1915, and over 300,000 were manufactured by Webley & Scott at Birmingham during World War I. After World War I some Mark VI`s were produced at Enfield Lock. The British decided that .455 was too heavy a cartridge for the most effective use after World War I, and decided to use a .38 caliber cartridge based on the .38 Smith & Wesson instead. Webley designed a new pistol using many of the features of their commercial Mark III caliber .38 revolver. The .38 caliber design was taken over by Royal Small Arms Factory and adopted in World War II.

I have always liked Webley revolvers of all types and over the years, I have owned over fifty of the .455 Mark VI models. Your question surprised me because it sounds like you did a thorough examination of the markings and you should have noticed a date stamping on the left hand side of the frame near the front just below the cylinder. I do not believe that I have ever seen a Webley .455 Mark VI revolver that does not have this date stamp. To make sure, I reviewed photos of my various .455 Mark VI revolvers and all of them were stamped with the date. Without seeing your revolver it is hard to say why yours is missing the date marking.

Although I do not have serial number dating information for Webley .455 Mark VI revolvers, my review of revolvers from my collection inspired an idea which may be helpful in determining a date for your Webley. 455 Mark VI revolvers from my collection with serial numbers both lower (370,000 range) and higher (400,000 + range) than your serial number were all dated 1918. Hope this helps, let me know if you would like to sell, Marc.




16125  - MARLIN 93 VALUE
2/15/2020
Jeff Newburgh IN

Maker: Marlin, Model: 93, Caliber: 30-30, Barrel Length: 19'', Finish: Parkerized, SN: C3869

Question:
Could you tell me the value of this gun. I would say it is in fair condition. Is there a site that I could look up these guns for myself. I have several guns that seem to be older rifles that are in the same age range as this one.

Answer:
Jeff- To be honest, I really don`t know much about Marlins, and don`t much care for them either. So, my thoughts on value would not be helpful. A much better source would be to go to http://GunBroker.com. Then click on ``advanced search`` then click on the ``completed sales`` tab and search for ``Marlin 93.`` That should find all the Marlin 93s listed recently, and you can look for one in similar caliber, condition and barrel length. Look at the number of bids and be sure that people actually bid on it and see what they are willing to pay. Don`t waste time on ones where the seller wanted to start at a price which no one wanted to pay. John Spangler



16212  - 96 Mauser Parts Gun
2/15/2020
Mark

Maker: Mauser, Model: C.96, Caliber: 7.63, Barrel Length: 4¨, Finish: Rusty Patina, Light Pitting, SN: RECEIVER-481121, FRAME-614252

Markings:
Serial number: Barrel/upper receiver-481121, Frame-614252Markings: Crown over letter ¨U¨ on barrel/upper receiver and on bolt, ¨CATSTALBVT 7.63 GERMANY¨ on barrel, number 8745 on bolt, ¨NS¨ (small N inside big S) stamped on back of hammer (Stands for ¨Neues Sicherung¨ or¨New Safety,¨ correct?), Mauser logo on rear left panel on lower receiver, ¨WAFFENFABRIK MAUSEROBENDORF A NECKAR¨ on right side of lower receiver (between two milled recesses), ¨WAFFENFABRIKMAUSER OBENDORF-VII¨ on top of upper receiver.

Question:
I received this pistol as a trade for services not rendered on a customized Mauser 98 rifle (parkerizing a WW2 receiver purchased from Federal Arms with everything else new manufacture - don't panic). The pistol is in NRA ¨Good/Fair¨condition with an excellent bore. The pistol does not have a safety knob/lever, but I have been told that the ¨Neues Sicherung¨ designation indicates that it does not need one (although interior wear marks indicate that it did have one at one time). I am not sure if all the parts are original, but the different numbers between the upper receiver and lower receiver seems to be a good indicator that they are not. However, what I want to know is this: Is this pistol worth anything in the collectors market? I wanted to sell it for some time, but I cannot find a buyer. Because of this, I have decided to re-work it into a custom pistol (ala, Gun Digest Book of Pistol smithing, ¨Rebuilding The Junker¨). The store/firing range I received this pistol from, had it priced a little under $200 U.S., and the owner is an avid collector (one of the few that has a license to own full auto firearms in the state of Illinois), but I just want to make sure that I am not destroying available piece of history. Other than its poor appearance, it is an excellent shooter, and the recoil and accuracy I get from it is akin to a .22cal Ruger target pistol. I really like this pistol, and hope to carry it as a side-arm when I'm overseas and off duty (although 7.63 Mauser is a little hard to come by these days. . .). Also, is 7.62 Tokarev safe to fire from this pistol? I've been told by some individuals that it is safe, and told by others that it is a potential safety hazard due to high pressures.

Answer:
Mark, Your Mauser's frame was manufactured in 1930, the Receiver was manufactured in 1923. I would advise you not to use Tokarev ammunition in your 96 because it is loaded to higher pressures than the 96 Mauser was designed for. Your Mauser should definitely have a safety, lever "NS" is stamped to indicate that Mauser changed the design of the safety to allow the hammer to be dropped from a cocked position, with less danger, by pulling the trigger. There is little or no collectors interest in 96 Mauser's that are in the condition that you describe, thousands have been imported over the last decade from China. I don't think that refinishing your 96 would hurt the value or collectability... Marc



16211  - WWI Browning Pistol
2/11/2020
Andrew New Zealand

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Markings:
I was wondering if you could help me, I'm not overly familiar with guns and I'm having trouble finding any information on a World War 1 handgun used by German officers. The inscription stamped on the gun reads - fabrique-national-herstal-belgique Browning's pat brevete sgdg It is a pistol with the magazine fitting into the grip. There is an inscription (looks like three overlapping letters - possibly makers insignia?) surrounded by an oval on the handle. Thanx

Answer:
Andrew, the overlapping letters on your grips are FN which stands for Frabrique National. The information that you furnished me with could possibly describe several different Browning models that were manufactured prior to and during WWI, but I think that it is most likely that your pistol is either a Model 1900 or a Model 1903.

The Model 1900 Browning was chambered in 7.65mm. About one million 1900 Brownings were manufactured by Fabrique Nationale d'Armes de Guerre in Herstal, Belgium between 1900 and 1912. Some 1900's have German safety markings and it is likely that several thousand were made for a German military contract. The 1900 was procured by the Belgium army as an officers' weapon and for the Calvary and gendarmie. Some Belgium military pistols were undoubtedly captured and used or reissued by the German military during its advance through Belgium in 1914 or during the four year occupation of Belgium. It was with a 1900 Browning that Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated in 1914.

The 1903 Browning was chambered in 9mm Browning Long. About 100,000 model 1903 Brownings were manufactured between 1903 and 1914 and manufacture of the 1903 continued until 1923. The 1903 pistol was adopted by the Belgium military in 1904 and like the model 1900 some were undoubtedly captured and used by the German military. The 1903 is the only pistol made before 1920 that chambers the 9mm Browning Long ammunition... Marc




16121  - HERTERS REVOLVER
2/11/2020
Germany

Maker: Herters, Model: .22 LR, Caliber: .2. LR, Barrel Length: 5.5, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Markings:
NONE

Question:
I AM LOOKING AT ONE, WHAT SHOULD I PAY.

Answer:
Of course the correct answer is ``Pay as little as you have to.``

Herters was a major player in the sporting goods and firearms related market in the 1960s, and then died off. They made reloading gear, sporter stocks, tools, ammo components, fishing gear, etc. All of it touted as ``world`s best`` from old family recipes, yada yada. It was all pretty good quality and very reasonably priced. Lately, it seems that Cabelas has taken up the name on some of its product lines. I assume you are asking about revolvers from the original Herters company. They made some single action centerfire revolvers which were pretty good quality, some in gimmicky proprietary calibers, and I believe actually made in Germany. I don`t recall anything good or bad about the .22 rimfire guns. I would think that they would have modest value, well below Colt or Ruger guns, and probably less than High Standard or Iver Johnson as well. I think they are probably better than the current Heritage or Rough Rider brand guns, which seem to sell for $100 or less. Frankly, I would buy something else, probably a Ruger if looking for a shooter, but if I wanted to collect Herters stuff, I would get one without any expectations for shooting quality. John Spangler




16120  - FRENCH MLE 1892 RIFLE
2/8/2020
Royce

Maker: Mle 1892, Model: Gd, Caliber: 8 Mm, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Don`t Know, SN: 2366

Markings:
following markings on butt: 60142 -SC- stock side: ju1n MA 1921 c.

Question:
was given this rife -SC- trying find when made -SC- who: and value?

Answer:
Royce- There are currently no good books on French military rifles, although Ian McCollum of ForgottenWeapons.com has one at the printers now which should fill that need. The French loved to mark things, sometimes in plain French, other times with cryptic abbreviations. On the Model 1892 Berthier carbines the maker is usually marked on the left side of the receiver with the full name, such as ``Manufacture d` Armes St. Etienne.`` The barrel usually is marked with the date it was made and the abbreviation of the maker MA (for Manufacture d` Armes) and the initial of the arsenal- S for St. Etienne, C for Chatterault, etc. Quite often the maker (or overhaul) location is also marked on the stock. In your case Juin 1921 would be a June 1921 date of overhaul, and MA indicating one of the arsenals with a letter not noted to identify it. Or, maybe MA alone was sufficient for rework by a location other than one of the major arsenals. When Ian`s book is in hand (I ordered a copy already) I will know more. But, I really don`t care that much about French arms and it may take a while before I dig into it. John Spangler



16205  -
2/8/2020
Steve, Leslie, Michigan, USA,

Maker: J.P. Sauer & Sohn Suhl, Model: Semi-automatic Pistol, Caliber: 7.65, Barrel Length: 3¨, Finish: Blued, SN: 267638

Question:
My father brought this pistol home with him from WWII. He recently passed away, and I would like to learn some more about this gun since it is now mine. Also, if there are any good sources for parts for this gun, I would be very grateful to learn of them. I especially need another clip for it, and one of the grips is broken. Thank you very much for your time and information.

Answer:
Steve, you probably have a Sauer Model 38. The Sauer Model 38 has a fixed barrel with coaxial recoil spring, the breach block is a separate component pinned into the slide. The Model 38 was unique in that it has and internal hammer which is linked to a de-cocking lever on the left side of the frame. If the hammer is cocked, pressing the de-cocking lever will allow the hammer to fall under control. If the hammer is down, downward pressure on the de-cocking lever will lift the hammer to full-cock. The lockwork is double-action and there is a magazine safety, and a chamber-loaded signal pin. Some very early model 38's and those made in 1944 and 1945 do not have a safety catch. Model 38 slides are marked 'JP Sauer & Sohn Cal 7,65' on the left, and `Patent' on the right. Model 38 grips carry the Sauer monogram (S&S). Model 38 magazine bases are stamped with the Sauer monogram and CAL. 7.65 (the Sauer monogram is omitted from magazines with a roll stamped floor plate). The military acceptance stamp (eagle over 37) is located on the upper left side of trigger guard. There is no military test proof. Commercial test proof (eagle over n) is located on the right side of the slide above the slide grip, on the right side of the frame below the slide grip, and on the right side of the barrel near the muzzle. Although this pistol was designated the model 38, its mass production did not commence until the late months of 1939. Sauer 38 serial numbers were initiated at approximately 260000 and terminated near 525000. Over 200,000 Model 38 pistols were procured for the German Military, Police, and NSDAP prior to April, l945 when the U.S. Army overran the Sauer factory. Because of the hammer-cocking lever, the Sauer 38 is one of the most advanced pistol designs ever to be mass-produced. The German designation for the weapon was Sauer Pistole Modell 38 Hahn Selbstspannung (Sauer Pistol Model 38 Hammer Selfcocking). Try Gun Parts Corp. for a source of parts, we have a link to them on our links page. Marc



16118  - MUZZLE DECORATIONS ON MARLIN 92
2/4/2020
John Mattox, Columbia Missouri, USA

Maker: Marlin, Model: 92, Caliber: 22, Barrel Length: Unk, Finish: Blue, SN: 280386

Markings:
Simple Marlin 92, octagonal lever action

Question:
First, I think I have the serial correct. I`m going off memory... Anyway, The barrel crown has four stars and four circles between each star, stamped on it. Ever seen anything like this?

Answer:
John- I have seen some muzzle loaders with various decorative markings applied to the muzzle, presumably by the maker. But, in the case of Marlins, I think it was probably done by a later owner. The reason why is inexplicable. John Spangler



16204  - Winchester 290
2/4/2020
brendan, baldwin,ny usa

Maker: Winchester, Model: 290, Caliber: 22, Barrel Length: 19.25 Inch, Finish: Blue, SN: CANT FIND ONE

Markings:
Barrel marked WINCHESTER 22 S,L,orLR Made in USA By sights, on either side it says WINCHESTER, other side it says MODEL 290, no other markings to be seen. Is there a serial number under wood somewhere?

Question:
Grandfather gave me this semi-auto when I was ten, most prized possession, when was it made, and why is it hard to find info on this gun, Thank You.

Answer:
brendan, prior to 1968 there was no requirement for manufacturers to put serial numbers on their guns, so some did, and some did not. Since your Winchester does not have a serial number, I can not give you an exact year of manufacture, I can only tell you that the Winchester Model 290 rifle was manufactured between 1965 and 1975. The fact that your rifle does not have a serial number can further narrow the date range down to between 1965 and 1968.

In its day, the 290 was Winchester`s Deluxe model autoloader 22. The stock was selected walnut with a fluted Monte Carlo comb and a low-relief cheek piece. It came with machine-cut basket-weave checkering and sling swivels.

I imagine that the difficulties in finding information on your 290 stems in part from the model`s unpopularity in the collector community. The 290 was introduced at a time when many believe that Winchester was sacrificing quality in an effort to cut costs. The alloy receiver with painted finish also contribute to the models unpopularity among collectors.

There are complaints on the Internet about the 290`s weak receiver and its tendency to jam, among other things, but there are also a lot of people like you who love them.

I am glad that you have this rifle to remind you of your grandfather and I hope that you can pass it down to your own grandson some day. Marc




16202  -
2/1/2020
Barb

Maker: S&W, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
We have a Smith and Wesson revolver with the serial number 47200 on the end. Can you tell us when it was manufactured?

Answer:
Barb - The pictures help, this is a S&W Double Action 3rd Model made 1882-1883, total production is about 21,232. Value for a revolver in this condition is under $200.



16113  - M1861 SPRINGFIELD MUSKET FAMILY HEIRLOOM RESTORATION
2/1/2020
Charles, Hauppauge, NY

Maker: Springfield, Model: 1861?, Caliber: .59, Barrel Length: 40, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Markings:
Engraved by the Sergeant of the 40th NY Regiment, Co. D.

Question:
I have the engraved stock and about 11 pieces...look for a barrel, lock, forend (it was cut down) and 38 other parts to put this gun back together as a display piece. My 3x great-grandfather served in this Company. an you help? I can send pics.

Answer:
Charles- Congratulations on owning a nice family heirloom. The 40th New York Volunteer Infantry was also known as the ``Mozart Regiment,`` or the ``Constitution Guard,`` but I don`t know if that has a musical connection or maybe the Colonel was named Mozart. When first organized that were armed with .69 caliber Model 1842 muskets. In 1862 they had Enfield rifles, and 1863-64 they had .58 caliber Springfield Rifle Muskets.

We cannot help with parts for this. However, I highly recommend the good folks at S&S Firearms in Glendale, NY which is not too far from you. http://www.ssfirearms.com/ has their contact info. They are mainly mail order, but if you call them and make an appointment to bring in what you have, they can probably fix you up with everything you need, or recommend other folks if you need something they don`t have.

I applaud your desire to restore this, although it is a goodly portion of the gun. However, it is nothing like the Kentucky rifle collector who allegedly ended up with a beautiful engraved and relief carved flintlock rifle, restored from a buttplate screw he had.

If you have not done so already, you should get a copy of your ancestor`s Civil War service record from the National Archives.

The 40th NY was a ``fighting regiment`` which served from late 1861 to the surrender at Appomattox, participating in most of the major battles with the Army of the Potomac. There is an excellent history of the regiment on the New York Department of Military and Naval Affairs page, including a lot of links to other sources. https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/40thInf/40thInfMain.htm

Hope that helps. John Spangler