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15981  - MARLIN MODEL 1894
4/23/2019
Jerry Bemidji

Maker: Marlin, Model: Model 94, Caliber: . 32-20, Barrel Length: 23.5, Finish: Rusty, SN: 343083

Question:
When was it manufactured and what is it worth

Answer:
Jerry- Marlin made good quality lever action rifles, but was less successful in marketing them, or in getting modern collectors interested in their products. The Marlin Model 1894 was a competitor of the Winchester Model 1892, both being chambered for typical revolver cartridges such as the .25-20, .32-20, .38-40 and .44-40. Marlin made about 250,000 of these between 1894 and 1935 mainly as standard rifles or carbines, but also a few baby carbines and musket models. Dating these is hard because Marlin used a single series of serial numbers shared by multiple models of rifles, and I have not figured out how to determine dates yet. Value will be modest, mainly due to being in rusty condition, so maybe $100-200. Even in nice condition these tend to run around half the price of a similar Winchester. (So, thrifty collectors can get an impressive collection of Marlins for a lot less than their pals who collect Winchesters, then spend the savings on a cool car and pick up pretty women while the Winchester guys get left with the less attractive girls.) John Spangler



16026  - 1917 Luger Value
4/23/2019


Maker: ?, Model: Luger, Caliber: 9mm, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Markings:
1917

Question:
We have a 1917 German luger 9mm Gun with all matching numbers, with leather holster and wooden stock that attaches to gun.. General Choquette who served in WW1 and WW2 obtained Gun and several Nazi items, General Choquette served under George Patton. Also there was a small match box brought back with Hans Hussinger Jewerly located in Germany on Josef Goebbels St 24 with WW1 photo pins and necklace in it. These items may be related to the luger since its dated 1917 and there is a pic of a WW1 soldier. Please advise what the value of this Gun could go for.

Answer:
The pistol looks like a nice gun, especially with the holster and stock but I am afraid that the documentation that you sent does not help value much. In 1968 the ATF still considered that shoulder stocked guns were subject to the National Firearms Act (NFA), the document that you furnished is ``amnesty registration`` paperwork. While it confirms the owner at the time, it does nothing to verify history and adds only a tiny fraction of what WWII vintage ``capture papers`` would add.

The date of the newspaper clipping looks like long after WW2 when your relative was in Mass National Guard. It is not nearly as interesting or valuable to collectors as ties to a U.S. general in WWII would be.

The other items (except the holster) do not look to me like items that would be of much interest to most gun collectors.

While the family history is interesting, without better documentation, it does not increase the value of the Luger much. Hope this helps, Marc




15980  - M1903A3 NATIONAL MATCH RIFLE
4/20/2019
Bryan

Maker: Remington, Model: 1903A3, Caliber: 30-06, Barrel Length: 24, Finish: Parkerized, SN: 3516453

Markings:
Straight stock unmarked except ordnance bomb at forend, Redfield Olympic rear sight, NS bolt, milled butt plate, RA 2-43 barrel.

Question:
This rifle is setup similar to a 1903A3 national match but I`m having trouble checking the serial number to see if it may be real. Realize very few were made and chances are slim but wanted to check. Thanks

Answer:
Bryan- The M1903A3 National Match rifle is the classic story of a bureaucracy doing stuff without understanding why they were doing it. William Brophy`s ``The 1903 Springfield Rifles`` is the best source on these rifles, since he was involved. Basically, the Army was looking for a cheap way to make National Match rifles available in the mid 1950s when National Match competition resumed. There were people who said the M1 Garand could never be made to shoot very accurately and that they needed to make a bolt action Springfield NM again. With millions of rifles on hand, funding for making new rifles was scarce, so modifying/rebuilding existing M1903s sounded good. Some guys figured out that a NM rifle needed some good sights, so they decided that attaching the excellent Redfield Olympic sight on to a M1903A3 was the solution. Add one of the smooth body nickel steel bolts, polished for smooth operation, clean up the trigger pull, add a milled buttplate and problem solved.

Well, almost. The location where they put the Olympic sight blocked the stripper clip guides, so the rifle could not be used in rapid fire matches. Well, just move it back a hole, they said, but if that was done the sight blocked to bolt from opening. (OOPS!) Only about 140 of these were made before the problem was spotted and the project quickly ended. Eventually some (or all?) got sold off through the old DCM program, and some of those probably ended up getting further modified into Bambi blasters and lost to the collecting community.

My example was found by pure luck. I stopped in a small Midwest gun show and bought a M1903A4 sniper rifle from a gentleman, who said had the box for it at home, and would send it later. Eventually the box arrived, but it was the wrong one. It was a DCM shipping box stenciled for M1903A3 National Match rifle [serial number]. I eagerly contacted him and asked if he had the rifle to go with that box, and he did and we made a deal and added it to my collection. Short of having the DCM box, or a copy of the DCM paperwork it is nearly impossible to tell a real M1903A3 NM from one put together recently. I think that CMP may have access to the old DCM records, but maybe not. Frank Mallory tried to get access to them for Springfield Research Service but the Army refused to cooperate. Hope that helps. John Spangler




16015  - Winchester 32-20 Value
4/20/2019
Marvin Harrisburg Oregon Usa

Maker: Winchester, Model: 32wcf, Caliber: 32-20, Barrel Length: 24, Finish: Blue, SN: 419683

Markings:
Saddle ring

Question:
Aprox worth In Good condition

Answer:
Marvin, you list ``32wcf`` as the model of your rifle, but 32wcf is not a model, it is a caliber. Several models of Winchester rifle had 24 inch barrels and were available in 32-20, without knowing what model that you have, I cannot give you a value but I can guess.

My guess is that you have a Model 1892, over one million Winchester Model 1892 rifles were manufactured between 1892 and 1941 when production ceased. Records indicate that the year of manufacture for Model 1892 rifle, serial number 419683 is 1908. The 1892 was first listed in the July 1892 Winchester catalog and factory records indicate that the first delivery to warehouse stock was made on May 3, 1892. The Model 1892 was devised as a companion rifle that would chamber popular center fire handgun calibers 44-40, 38-40, and 32-20. The 25-20 chambering was developed especially for this model and was added in August 1895. The 1892 was the same basic design as the earlier Model 1886 with a slightly simplified mechanism and some component parts scaled down in size to handle the smaller handgun calibers. Winchester offered the Model 1892 in several different configurations:

The 1892 carbine was manufactured from 1893-1941, it usually had a straight wrist butt, a band around the forend, and a round 20in barrel. ``Trappers Carbines`` were also offered with 12-18 inch barrels. Carbine production continued in 25-20 and 44-40 calibers even after 1892 rifle production had been abandoned.

The 1892 Fancy Sporting Rifle was manufactured from 1892-1930, it had a fancy pistol grip buttstock and could be ordered in any of the standard barrel styles with full or half length magazine.

The 1892 Musket was manufactured from 1898-1903, it had a 30 inch barrel, a straight-wrist buttstock, three barrel bands, a nose cap and swivels.

The 1892 Sporting Rifle was manufactured from 1892-1932, the standard pattern had a straight-wrist butt, a concave shoulder plate, and a 24in round, octagon or half-octagon barrel.

The 1892 Take Down Rifle was announced in the autumn of 1893, but very few were ever manufactured.

The Model 1892 was immensely popular both in the United States and for many years throughout South America, Australia, and the Far East, it was the second Winchester model to pass the one million production mark. The millionth 1892 rifle (chambered in 32-20) was engraved and presented to the United States Secretary of War, Patrick Hurley, on December 17, 1932. Admiral Robert E. Peary carried a Model 1892 carbine on his trips to the North Pole.

Blue book Model 1892 values range from $150 to over $2500 depending on condition, year of manufacture and configuration. Marc




15979  - KRAG RIFLE USAGE HISTORY
4/16/2019
Andrew, Rock City Falls, NY, USA

Maker: Springfield Armory, Model: 1898 Krag, Caliber: 30, Barrel Length: 24 Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: 218000

Markings:
None. This rifle appears to have been sporterized.

Question:
What might you be able to tell me about the history of this rifle? I understand that it was likely manufactured in 1899 based on the serial number. I am curious to know if it may have seen use in the Philippines or deployed with the Buffalo Soldiers?

Answer:
Andrew- About the only source of usage history is the Springfield Research Service database built by the late Frank Mallory from his decades of diligent research into obscure records at the National Archives. Serial number 218000 is not listed in any of the records he found and no more are likely to turn up in the future. You are probably right about it being made in 1899 and most rifles were being shipped directly to new units being raised to occupy Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Philippines as U.S Volunteer Infantry regiments. Rifles were not made or shipped in exact serial number sequence, so it is impossible to state that if rifle ``x`` is documented as being used somewhere that number ``x +/-1`` were also used there. While there are patterns of usage data, there are so many anomalies that it is just not possible to know. What we do know, is that many rifles in this range were used in the Philippine insurrection era, and many were issued again during WW1 for use in stateside training and a few made it to France with support units. So, even if you cannot say ``This exact rifle was used in the Philippines,`` you can certainly say this is the same model used in the Philippines. Hope that helps. John Spangler



16013  -
4/16/2019
Gary Auburn Hills MI

Maker: Remington, Model: 552, Caliber: 22, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: 1668343

Markings:
CW 68

Question:
Got this from Grandpa, looking for a value please No rust or scratches, not sure if ever fired. Wood excellent, glossy, not marks

Answer:
Marvin, the Remington 552 Speedmaster is one of my favorite .22 rifles. I have had one of the BDL models since I was a boy and I have always loved to take it out and plink with it.

Wikipedia indicates that the model was first introduced in 1957, it features a self-loading, blowback action featuring a low profile left-side bolt handle that lends itself to a clean receiver appearance and slender profile. The rifle is equipped with both open sights and a 3/8`` (9.5 mm) dovetail rail for mounting a scope and a safety on the trigger guard. The Speedmaster was manufactured from 1957 to 1988 in a standard model. In 1966 Remington offered this rifle with a special stamping of the company`s 150th anniversary on the left side of the receiver.

In 1991, the walnut butt stock of the BDL Deluxe version was altered to incorporate a Monte Carlo comb to improve cheek weld when using the rifle with a telescopic sight, while the impressed checkering on the butt stock and forearm was changed to machine-cut checkering. In 2017, after complaints that the Monte Carlo comb made the rifle difficult to use with open sights, Remington returned to a straight comb stock design for current production BDL rifles.

552 Speedmaster values in the blue book range from around $100 for rifles in poor condition to over $500 for BDL models that are in excellent condition. Hope that this helps, Marc




16014  - Broomhandle Value
4/14/2019
Blake, Rockport, TX

Maker: Mauser, Model: C-96, Caliber: 7.63mm, Barrel Length: 5.5'', Finish: Don`t Know, SN: 118620

Question:
What is this type of antique worth these days? I have a Chinese-made stock that I had made but not original. Thanks,Blake

Answer:
Blake, my records indicate that your Broomhandle was made in 1910. The Model 1896 Mauser has always been one of my favorite pistols, its design is unique because it only has one screw (the grip screw) and no pins. The first time that I ever dissembled a 96 Mauser I remember thinking that it reminded me of a Chinese puzzle.

Values for this type of 96 Mauser vary greatly, $200 to $2000 or more depending upon condition. Sorry that I can not be more helpful, but without information about condition that is the best that I can do.




15976  - REMINGTON MODEL 10 RIOT GUN?
4/14/2019
Indiana

Maker: Remington, Model: 10-A, Caliber: 12 Ga, Barrel Length: 20 Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: 133015

Markings:
Cyl on barrel, U 133015 stamped on barrel and receiver, stamped Remington umc on stock pad and trigger loop I think the gun is a 1915 year

Question:
Is it a riot?...im just really confused because there is no flaming bomb with U.S insignia

Answer:
Sir- Your question really involves several questions. A- is it a U.S. military used riot gun; B- is it a real riot gun or just a cut down sporting gun, or one of the trench guns arsenal converted to riot configuration; and C- when was it made?

Probably the best reference on these is Bruce Canfield`s ``Complete Guide to U.S. Military Shotguns.`` (Even though there is an error on the identification of the barrels for the trench guns- which have a single milled depression for the handguard retaining screw, not the three transverse notches like the Winchesters as he incorrectly states.)

Canfield lists the possible range for both the WW1 military riot and trench Model 10s as 117731-165566, based on Springfield Research Service discoveries in the National Archives. Checking the actual SRS data we see that the earliest recorded date for a low serial number seems to be 114722 inspected in NYC on October 24, 1917, along with 29 others, and eventually the highest number recorded being 165566. So, your number falls in a plausible range of serial numbers for U.S. martial use. The Remington factory shop serial number record books for the Model 10 begin September 30. 1919 at 172939 so they do not help. (They are at the Remington Society of America site at https://www.remingtonsociety.org/factory-record-book-serials/ and may help with some other models.)

It is believed that the Remington Model 10s purchased for military use were hand stamped with a flaming bomb over US after purchase (as were several Winchester models). It is unclear if the was done at the factory upon delivery or a later attempt to mark them as military property. Normally the bomb/US are on the left side of the receiver, but sometimes on the rear of the barrel. The lack of the bomb/US marking raises serious doubts about a gun being military used, but is not positive proof it was not.

Exact quantities purchased are debated by scholars and collectors, but much smaller than the number of Winchester Model 1897s purchased during WW1. The Model 10 Trench guns have 23 inch barrels with a wooden handguard, secured at the rear by a sheet metal piece which secures to the barrel extension with a screw on each side. Presence of these screw holes, and provisions for a typical sling swivel on the butt will help identify a trench gun cut back to 20 inch barrel length for use as a riot gun. Springfield (and likely other facilities) did repairs on Model 10 shotguns into the 1930s, which would include such alterations as well as routine parts replacements. Normal barrel length on the riot model is 20 inches and the barrel will be slightly crowned and have a bead front sight for both military and commercial purchase.

So, with all that, it appears that you have a gun with the correct barrel length to be a Model 10 riot gun. It is within the Martial serial number range, but while there are scattered data points on the fringes, the vast majority of surviving data is in the 150,000- 165,000 range. If you have the butt swivel and handguard retaining strap holes, then I would consider it to be a legitimate U.S. purchase gun, otherwise it is unlikely, although not impossible. If made as a riot and lacking the trench conversion features, presence of an arsenal overhaul cartouche would enhance the odds of it being military. Otherwise it is likely a riot gun sold for commercial or law enforcement use.

Real WW1 Remington Model 10 trench or riot models are highly desirable collector items. One that is ``possible but not probable`` will still have some interest, but the price will be a lot less. Hope that helps. John Spangler




16006  - FN-FAL Or L1A1?
4/9/2019
Jay

Maker: Fabrique Nationale, Model: FN-FAL L1A1, Caliber: .308, Barrel Length: 20¨, Finish: Black, SN: ?

Question:
I have heard that the metric pattern is better to buy because of readily available magazines. I always thought that L1A1 meant it was inch pattern, and FN-FAL meant it was metric. I have researched and have not been able to tell the difference in the names. Which name is inch, which is metric? Is one better than the other? What are the differences? Thank You Jay

Answer:
Jay- I got a chance to shoot some of these when we had Dutch Marines and Argentine Marines embarked on a ship I was on. Fine guns, but they ain't collectable in my book. You need to study up in one of the following: Blake Stevens FN-FAL (3 volume set available from Collector grade publications), or one of the recent editions of Small Arms of the World. The Stevens book is especially good, and if you are serious about these rifles, you should invest the $150 or so it costs for a set... John Spangler.



16003  - Model 1917 Trench Knife
4/9/2019
john@earthlink.net

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: N/A, Barrel Length: N/A, Finish: ?, SN: NONE

Question:
A friend of mine recently picked up what appears to be a WW I era trench-type knife (knuckle guard) labeled "1917" with a triangular blade. Have you ever heard of these?

Answer:
In the trench warfare of WW-I close combat often ensued, the US Army developed the ''trench knife'' to be used in close combat situations. The model 1917 trench knife had a sharply pointed triangular blade that could easily penetrate cloth and leather. The grips were made of wood and had four shallow finger grooves. The knuckle guard was a sheet iron stamping with a row of pyramid shaped spikes projecting along the outside edge. The spikes along the edge of the knuckle guard were to allow the weapon to be used as a ''knuckle duster''. In 1918 the pyramid shaped projections on the knuckle guard were changed to a triangular shape. In late 1918 the Mark 1 trench knife was introduced, with a flat stabbing blade and a bronze handle with four finger loupes and pointed projections on the outside. These trench knifes were used by both the Army and the Marine Corps... Marc



16002  -
4/6/2019
Mike mikegh.sales@sympatico.ca

Maker: W.W. Greener, Model: Double Barrel, Caliber: 10ga, Barrel Length: 30¨, Finish: Plain, SN: 133XXX

Markings:
Between barrels says ¨WW Greener St. Mary's Works Birmingham Macnab & Marsh Canadian Agents Under forearm says ¨Not For Ball¨ with the numbers 11B 12M and 3 indefinable stampings. All pieces are stamped with the same serial number. Steel butt and pistol plates. There is some engraving. Wood is in decent condition

Question:
I would just like some info on the maker and the age of the gun. Also is the gun of any collector value or is there even a following for this makers guns. Thanks

Answer:
Mike, I have to admit that I have never been very interested in W.W. Greener shotguns and so I don't know much about them. My books tell me that W.W. Greener has been a maker of only the best quality rifles and shotguns since 1829. Approx. 20-50 rifles and shotguns are made annually by W.W. Greener and prices for some of their more expensive models can be in excess of $30,000. "Double Barrel" is not a W.W. Greener model name so I will guess that your shotgun is a Farkiller Grade F35 Large Bore, because the Farkiller Grade F35 Large Bore is the only model that I can find that is offered in 10 Ga.. Farkiller Grade F35 Large Bore values for range from $1,000 to over $3500 depending on condition. If I have made some incorrect guesses about your shotgun maybe there is a Greener expert out there who will read this answer and send in some better information... Marc



16004  - Springfield Rifle (M1884 .45-70)
4/6/2019
Ed. erohwer@sky.net

Maker: U.S. Springfield, Model: 1878, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: 60, Finish: Blue, SN: 38XXXX

Markings:
VP

Question:
Any idea what the age of this rifle is ?Do you know of anyone in the phoenix area that can work on this, it needs a firing pin ?I am interested in restoring this to working condition. Any idea where I can get ammunition for this ?

Answer:
Ed- Bring your rifle to the Crossroads of the West Gun Show in Phoenix on 22-23 February. I will have firing pins and some other parts there with me, and be able to figure out exactly what you need. I can also do most of the work involved on these rifles. No charge to take a look and tell you what is required. Your rifle was made around 1888, but is known as the Model 1884. It uses .45-70 ammunition, preferably black powder loads, although there are some smokeless loads that are safe for "trapdoor" rifles. There may be ammo dealers at that show who have appropriate ammo. I am too much of a collector at heart to recommend firing old guns. Besides, too many unemployed lawyers are trying to pay for their kids' college education, so I will never recommend firing old guns. Instead, I chicken out and advise people to have it examined by a competent gunsmith, so they lawyers will sue them instead if the thing blows up... John Spangler



15999  - Remington .310 Skeet Cartridges
4/2/2019
Bruce, Sheboygan Falls, Wi

Maker: Remington, Model: ?, Caliber: .310 Skeet, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
I have a box of shells that I can not identify. The box is marked as follows: .310 Remington Skeet Kleanbore Priming Index #21072The shells are all brass, about the same size as a .32 mag pistol cartridge. They are rimfire with a rolled crimp and a clear plastic disk covering a shot charge that appears to be # 9 shot. The box is a slip top box which holds 250 cartridges. The box is white and green colored. I have not been able to find any info on this cartridge in any of the books that I own.

Answer:
Bruce- I never heard of them either. John L. Barber's "The Rimfire Cartridge 1857-1984" has some info. He shows seven variations of the .310 skeet cartridge. Five have 6-fold star crimps, and two have a roll crimp. Of the latter, one has the clear plastic wad like yours and the other has a yellow wad. These both have a "U" with a dot headstamp. My guess is that these are probably from the 1940-60 period when there seemed to be a lot of interest in small caliber shotguns. One ammo dealer has the clear wad variety offered at 50 cents per round. You might be able to find out some more about what sort of gun was associated with these by looking through old copies of "Gun Digest" or "Shooters Bible"... John Spangler



16001  - Western Field Model 13 Value
4/2/2019
Jan Ballston spa NY

Maker: Westernfield, Model: Model 13, Caliber: 22, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
I got this gun from my father when he passed away, It is a very heavy gun for a 22cal my son tried using it for hunting but found it was a bit to heavy to carry around the woods, it has a clip and a thick barrel and a place under the front stock for a stand or something to that affect, I would like to sell it to get him one he could carry, would it be worth selling or just keep it for a conversation piece?

Answer:
Jan, I could not find the Western Field Model 13 in any of my reference books, I can tell you that there is not much interest in Western Field firearms, values are in the $75.00 or less range. Marc