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15728  - Fabico 22
12/12/2017
Bethany

Maker: Fabico, Model: #3., Caliber: 22.1, Barrel Length: Snubbed Nose 2-3 In, Finish: Stainless Steel, SN: (63). 41237

Question:
Year and value

Answer:
Bethany, what you have is probably an RG10, these were imported by Fabico of Florida and bear the Fabico name. Rohm GmbH (RG) of Sontheim / Brenz Germany, produced a line of cheap revolvers, starting pistols, gas pistols and alarm pistols for export to the U.S. If memory serves me correctly, these revolvers were manufactured and imported in the 1960s, prior to the passage of the 1968 gun control act, they are often referred to as ``Saturday Night Specials``. I often see RG revolvers selling at gunshows for as little as $25.00. Frankly, I consider them only marginally safe to shoot, and would never want to own one, let alone try to shoot it. Sorry that I can not give you better news about this revolver, Marc



15695  - WW1 U.S. MILITARY SHOTGUN SERIAL NUMBER RANGES
12/12/2017
Johan J. Visser, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

Maker: ?, Model: US ARMY Shotgun WW1 Or Before., Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Question:
Good Day, I`m looking for a list with the serial numbers for US ARMY shotguns so I can find out the manufacturing date. Could you sent me one, I don`t have a number yet because I`m still looking for sale on a military fair and if I find one I need to be shore about the manufacturing date before I can buy it. Thanks already, Johan

Answer:
Johan- The best reference books on U.S. military shotguns are those by Bruce Canfield. His “Complete Guide to United States Military Combat Shotguns” is the best comprehensive coverage for all periods. However, for WWI era I would recommend his “U.S. Infantry Weapons of the First World War.” This covers all the handguns, rifles, shotguns, machine guns, mortars, grenade launchers, bayonets, etc in great detail, and is very useful with serial number ranges and the like. He also provides a lot of information on markings, finish, and things to help tell a real one from a fake.

In his WW1 book, Canfield notes that the 25,000 Winchester Model 97 trench and a smaller number of riot guns fall into three distinct serial number blocks: E433134-E474130; E514382-E566857 and E613303-E697066 with most falling in the latter block. (His later Combat Shotgun book deletes mention of the first two blocks.)

Although no WW1 Winchester Model 12 trench guns are know, there were a small number of Model 12 riot guns thought to fall into the 162340-190507 range.

There were also 3,500 Remington Model 10 trench and 1,500 Model 10 riot guns, with 23 inch barrels for the trench version and 20 inch on the riot guns. Many of the trench guns were later cut back to riot length. Although numbers are not listed in his WW1 book, the Combat Shotgun book lists the range as 117,731 to 165,566.

Canfield’s Combat Shotgun book also lists several other makers and models of shotguns procured prior to WW1 in small numbers.

My advice is to buy BOTH of the books mentioned above, and also Canfield’s “U.S. Infantry Weapons of WW2” BEFORE you go shopping for a gun! Either way you will buy an education, but money spent on books will save or make you a lot of money in the long run. John Spangler




15712  - Model 94 In 32 Special Value
12/9/2017
Emporia, Kansas

Maker: Winchester, Model: 94 32 Spec, Caliber: 32 Spc, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: 2220XXX

Question:
Value?

Answer:
The model 1894 Winchester is one of the world`s most popular firearms, to date over 6 million 1894's have been manufactured and they are still going strong. Winchester guru George Madis indicates that the .32 Winchester Special was first offered in the Model 1894 (94) in 1902 and dropped in 1973. My records indicate that your Winchester was manufactured in 1957. Model 1894 Winchesters manufactured before 1964, bring a premium but condition plays a big part in determining their values. There is a big difference between NRA Excellent and NRA Good condition (see our NRA Condition Grading Definitions For Antique Firearms section). Values for your Model 1894 could range from $150.00 to over $750 depending on condition and finding the right buyer. Marc



15693  - REMINGTON .22 VEST POCKET DERINGER
12/9/2017
Darryl Catharpin VA USA

Maker: Remington, Model: .22 Pocket Vest Derringer, Caliber: .22, Barrel Length: 3 Inch, Finish: Nickel, SN: 1542

Markings:
On Top reflects Remington and patent date of Oct 1, 1861

Question:
I have one. The hammer pulls back but does not lock. Trigger pulls back and down against spring tension but does nothing else. Should the hammer lock back and be released by the trigger? Possibly the internal mechanisms are not working. Thanks.

Answer:
Darryl- Frankly, I have never handled one of these and have no idea how they work. However, there are some excellent drawing in the Duetsche Waffen Journal at http://i2.guns.ru/forums/icons/forum_pictures/006793/6793617.jpg There is also an explanation of how they work, but it is in German so it may be hard to understand.

Your best bet is to get a copy of Robert Hatfield’s “Remington’s Vest Pocket Pistols” which should have a lot more pictures and be understandable to us folks who only understand English. John Spangler




15716  - Winchester Model 55 Value
12/5/2017
MM Clearfield PA

Maker: Winchester, Model: 55 Takedown, Caliber: 30, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: 2388

Question:
Trying to find an approx value of this rifle, in excellent condition, unused for about 35 yrs, no rust, always in the family, cleaned by a gun expert a yr ago

Answer:
MM, Winchester manufactured over 20000 Model 55 rifles between 1924 and 1932. The design was a lever action with a solid frame, 24 inch round barrel, shotgun style serrated steel buttplate and tubular magazine that only held 3 cartridges. As you are aware, a takedown version was also offered. Models were available chambered in 25-35, .30-30, and .32 Winchester Special. Rifles chambered in 23-35 are the most popular with collectors, the blue book indicates that they are worth twice as much as rifles chambered in 30-30 or 32 Special.

Values in the blue book for Model 55 rifles chambered in 30-30 range from $300 to over $1700, they say to add 20% for takedown models like yours. Marc




15692  - STEEL CASE U.S. MILITARY AMMO FROM 1950s
12/5/2017
David, University Park, Md

Maker: Cartridge Case, Model: TW54, Steel., Caliber: .45 ACP, Barrel Length: None, Finish: Other, SN: NONE

Markings:
I have an empty cartridge case so I know nothing about the bullet.

Question:
We previously had a discussion of EC43 steel cases, when copper was short & steel was the expedient. The web has a lot of speculation about TW steel cases in multiple 1950s years, but no solid info. Can you say why it was used? Thanks.

Answer:
David- The U.S. Army produced some steel case small arms ammunition in the 1950s for the same reason they had during WW2. Brass requires copper and copper is both expensive and in short supply during wartime. Production in the 1950s was not so much a matter of necessity, but more that of gaining proficiency so it could be done quickly if it became necessary. Frankford Arsenal and several ammunition plants (Lake City, Twin Cities, and probably others) produced steel case .30 carbine, .45 ACP and .30-06 cartridges with headstamp dates around 1952-1956. These were loaded to duplicate the ballistic performance of normal ball ammunition made with brass cases, and work and function just as well and do not wear out parts any faster or anything else.

The full details are explained in several pages in the appropriate sections of the superbly researched and organized “History of Modern U.S. Military Small Arms Ammunition, Volume 3” by Hackley, Woodin and Scranton. You should consult that for solid, accurate, documented information. Ignore the stuff on the internet that someone’s friend heard at a gun show from some guy who knows someone who was a Green Beret during WW2 invading Guatemala and used some of that ammo, or similar nonsensical stories. Of course none of that is much less accurate or believable than what you read in the newspapers today. John Spangler.




15687  - UMC .45-70 CARTRIDGES UMC S H
12/2/2017
Thomas, Hatboro, PA

Maker: UMC Co ''SH'', Model: ?, Caliber: 45-70, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Question:
I have several blank rounds of this which I inherited and am seeking to classify and subsequently value them for sale. I also have a couple USC Co. rounds of the same type less the ''SH'' and 19 rounds of WRA Co., same type.

Answer:
Thomas- UMC indicates these were made by the Union Metallic Cartridge Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut, and the lack of REM indicated they were made prior to the affiliation with Remington in 1912. The “S H” indicates the cartridge case is a “Solid Head” type drawn construction which is normal today, but was a considerable improvement over the folded head construction used in the early days of cartridge manufacture. Solid heads were introduced beginning around 1880.

USC CO is the United States Cartridge Company which was founded in 1869 by former Civil War General, carbine inventor, lawyer, Congressman and later Rhode Island Governor Benjamin “Beast” Butler. They were located in Lowell, Massachusetts and were among the top few early producers of metallic ammunition. During WW1 they produced nearly 2/3 of U.S. small arms ammunition used in the war, and in 1920s the company was acquired by Winchester. There is not a lot of collector demand for any of the loose .45-70 blank cartridges and I would expect to find these selling at gun or cartridge collector shows for a dollar or less, with weak demand. Hope that helps. John Spangler




15714  - Excam Revolver
12/2/2017
Tom Stephens City VA. 22655

Maker: Excam Inc. (ARMI F. LLI TANFOGLIO GARDONE V. T ITALY), Model: TA 76, Caliber: 22lr. Single Action, Barrel Length: 4.75, Finish: Blued, SN: C43263

Markings:
PSF stamped on the right hand side, then there is a square with "AS" in it. There is "Cat. 885" below the cylinder on the right hand side. There is a marking that I cant tell what it is it looks like a "V" with fire or smoke in it. There is also what I think to be the Italian Shield stamped on the right hand side of the action and right over the ejector tube right in front of the receiver on the barrel.

Question:
How old is this gun and can/where do I find parts (cylinders mainly) for it. Thanks for any help.

Answer:
Tom, Excam of Hialeah Florida, went out of business in about 1990, if I remember correctly, they imported and distributed mostly low quality inexpensive firearms. I believe that the Excam 22 revolvers were manufactured in Italy. I do not know of a source for parts for Excam revolvers, and I think that it would be a waste of time and money to try to repair one. Your time and money would be much better spent investing in a good quality revolver like a Ruger Single Six. Marc