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16048  - SAVAGE 2219C In .22 Hornet
8/24/2019
val, layton, utah

Maker: Savage, Model: 219c, Caliber: 22 Hornet, Barrel Length: 24 Inch, Finish: Blue, SN: 21,111

Question:
what year was this firearm made, what does the letter ''c'' designate? I read that pre-war barrels were .223 and post-war are .224. Any information you can give will be helpful, thanks in advance

Answer:
Val- I regret we cannot help much with this. Info on Savage firearms is hard to find, which is a shame. They are mostly very good guns, well made, with a reputation for being very accurate even though they seldom win beauty contests. Someone really ought to do a good book on the company, but until then I cannot help. John Spangler



16091  -
8/24/2019
Andy, Stockton, Ca

Maker: Marble, Model: Game Getter, Caliber: 22 & 44, Barrel Length: 12'', Finish: Blue, SN: 134

Markings:
Mfged by the Marble Safety Axe Co

Question:
What is the value of this gun? The bluing is in poor condition, it does have all of the parts including the rear sight. It says ``Patent Allowed``

Answer:
Andy, Marble made axes, compasses and a nifty little over-under combination gun called the ``Game Getter.`` These were made from about 1907 to the 1920s, and with enough changes that there are a number of people who collect them. These were made in 12, 15 and 18 inch barrel lengths. The 18 inch versions are legal to buy and sell like any other cartridge rifle or shotgun. However those with 12 or 15 inch barrels are considered ``sawed off shotguns`` and illegal under federal law unless they were registered during the amnesty period after passage of the Gun Control Act of 1968. If registered there should be some BATF paperwork for them. If this is found, then they can be transferred with BATF approval, and payment of a transfer tax (I think it is $5.00 for these, compared to $200.00 for full auto guns). If the paperwork cannot be found, then these would be illegal to own , possess, sell, etc., and no responsible collector would touch one under any circumstances. Marc



16044  - Unknown Artillery Round
8/20/2019
Johnny

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Markings:
10x11x31/2 measurements of the artillery round

Question:
I have a artillery round I found in the closet I have come to finding it was a 1.65 Hotchkiss I have been thru pictures after pictures need help lol

Answer:
Johnny- To identify artillery cases you need to take some measurements. Two are absolutely essential:

(1) The overall length of the case, and (2) the inside diameter of the open end of the case. That will narrow down the number of possible matches immensely. Sometimes there may still be more possible answers, and then a measurement of the diameter of the rim, and diameter of the case just ahead of the rim (called the base). All of these should be in millimeters, or if in inches to the nearest 1/16`` and then converted to mm. Also, any markings on the base of the case will be very helpful. John Spangler




16090  - 1930 Commercial Broom Handle Mauser
8/20/2019
W.W. Johnson (Johnny) Flag. AZ.

Maker: Mauser, Model: Broom Handle, Caliber: 9mm, Barrel Length: 5.5in, Finish: Blue, SN: 8094XX

Markings:
Mauser left side of frame, Waffenfabrik Mauser Oberndorfyn on top of chamber. Waffenfabrik Oberndorf a Neckar on right side of frame. 13 rings on grips. Proofmark: letter U under crown with cross over crown

Question:
Is it a commercial or Military ? Are grips correct ? What year ? Also did they ever build a barrel length of 10.5 in. for a pistol with the slot for the stock cut into the grip, or is that carbine only ??????

Answer:
Johnny, my records indicate that your Mauser is an early 1930 commercial model manufactured between 1930 and 1932. Early 1930 commercial models are usually found in the 800000 - 890000 range and grips have 12 grooves. The crown over U proof mark that you describe is a German final or definitive proof mark that was used on firearms that were proofed in the finished state, use of this mark was discontinued in 1939. There were several changes incorporated into the 1930 Broomhandle design including:

  • A step which was added to the barrel contour just ahead of the chamber.
  • The safety mechanism was changed to allow the hammer to be dropped from a cocked position, without danger, by pulling the trigger, (this was called the Universal Safety). <br><br>
  • The front of the grip frame was widened to equal the width of the rear part of the frame where the stock slot is.

I can find no records of Mauser Broomhandle carbines being produced with 10.5-inch barrels and a stock cut in the backstrap. On page 178 of Belford & Dunlap's book "The Mauser Self-Loading Pistol", there is a picture of a 13.5-inch carbine with the stock slot cut in the backstrap.



16087  - Remington Model 06?
8/17/2019
Skip

Maker: Remington, Model: 06, Caliber: 22, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Markings:
I have a Remington Model 06, .22s/LR Marking on barrel shows Remington Pat Jun 26 88, Dec 6 92, Nov 27 96, May 30 1911 S/N 821527 Trying to identify when it was made and any info. Not in great shape but mostly surface rust and not been cleaned/oiled in many moons. Is something like this worth trying to clean up without touching the finish to keep it`s age?

Answer:
Skip, based on the information that you sent, I think that you have a Winchester, not a Remington. The Winchester Model 1906 was a simplified version of the earlier Winchester Model 1890, it usually came with a 20 inch round-flat crowned barrel, a straight-wristed buttstock, and a grooved cylindrical slide handle, average weight was 5.1 pounds. The M1906 was manufactured form 1906 to 1932, total production reached approximately 848,000 rifles, your rifle (sn 821527) was manufactured towards the end of production. The M1906 was initially offered only in 22 short, but after April 1908, the design was altered so rifles would chamber 22 Short, Long or Long Rifle. The M1906 was also offered in a deluxe `Expert` version which was manufactured from 1917 to 1925. The Expert version had a pistol grip butt stock and a specially-shaped slide handle. Expert rifles could be ordered in blue, with a nickel-plated receiver and trigger guard, or with all the metal parts nickel-plated. Values for Winchester Model 1906 rifles range from $150 to over $750 depending upon condition and configuration. If this were my rifle, I would clean it up and give it a good coat of light machine oil. I do not think that it would be wise to refinish it. Marc



16043  - Atkinson & Marquart Rifles Or Barrels
8/17/2019
Linh Bowie Trimont MN

Maker: Atkinson & Marquart, Model: Unknown, Caliber: 25-35, Barrel Length: 20, Finish: Blue, SN: 70006

Markings:
This rifles action resembles a rolling block without the lever action loop.

Question:
Do you have any information regarding this firearm?

Answer:
Linh- Interesting question. William T. ATKINSON and Paul E. MARQUART formed a partnership as A & M Rifle Co. in 1953, and then incorporated in 1964 as A & M Rifle Co., Inc. By 1973 the relationship had soured and Marquart accused Atkinson of doing stuff on his own instead of for the corporation and they fought it out in court, instead of the Field of Honor as in the olde days.

Before the breakup, the company had a great reputation, both as gunsmiths and barrel makers, in the same stature as P.O. Ackley, and as part of their business they developed a number of wildcat cartridge, like Ackley.

There is a story (adapted from Wikipedia) about their wildcat .475 A&M Magnum round. At the time of its development it was considered the most powerful sporting rifle cartridge ever developed. The cartridge and rifle were designed by the Atkinson & Marquart Rifle Co. of Prescott, Arizona. It necked up the then new .460 Weatherby Magnum (the most powerful commercial sporting cartridge available) for a .475`` diameter bullet.

``Fred N. Barnes, the founder of Barnes Bullets for whom the first rifle chambered for this cartridge was made, supplied the bullets. According to anecdotes, Fred Barnes gathered a group of people to demonstrate the rifle. The rifle was fired at the base of a small tree which was uprooted while Fred Barnes who had been shooting from a crouched position on a gravel bed had slid a few feet and ended on his back due to the recoil. The .475 A&M Magnum was never available commercially, and was only Barnes Bullets and Custom Brass and Bullets provided bullets for the cartridge.``

Atkinson & Marquart also tinkered with tiny calibers for the bench rest shooters. From AccurateShooter.com we learn:

``17 JAVELINA [cartridge-] Designed by Paul Marquart of A&M Gunshop, Prescott, Arizona, in 1958. ... A&M`s pet load was 18.6 grains of 3031, which launched the 25-grain Sisk bullet at 3,850 fps.``

As expert barrel makers and gunsmiths they could and did work on all sorts of guns in virtually any caliber the customer wanted. I suspect your rifle was made by Stevens, or perhaps Ballard which used sort of rolling block style actions. Once they are worked over with a new barrel, the original identity is hard to pin down unless you find a picture of the original rifle. There are also several books by James Grant on Single Shot Rifles with details of the many different single shot actions, and you can probably ID it from those. John Spangler




16088  - Essex Sawed Off Shotgun
8/14/2019
Charles Nelson Mathis Texas

Maker: Essex Gun Works, Model: .410 Single Break Over, Caliber: .410, Barrel Length: 12 Inches Sawed Off, Finish: Nickel, SN: A148921

Markings:
On side ESSEX wit SX OVER LOGO

Question:
Age ? Where made?

Answer:
Charles, I found 2 references to Essex shotguns in my library, it was a trade name used by Belknap Hardware Company of Louisville, Kentucky on shotguns made by Crescent Fire Arms Company, and J. Stevens Arms Company used it on some of their rifles and shotguns. You should be aware that ``Sawed Off Shotguns`` (shotguns with barrels less than 18 inches long) are not legal to own, unless you have registration papers from the BATF. Persons in possession of one of these firearms would be subject to 10 years and or $10,000 fine if the feds catch you with it. You may want to consider placing a call to the BATF (look in blue pages under US Treasury Dept) and making arrangements to turn it in to them for destruction. Marc



16042  - Iver Johnson .38 Revolver Date Of Manufacture
8/14/2019
Tristan kwiatkowski Pittston pa

Maker: Iver Johnson And Cycle Works, Model: Second, Caliber: 38s&w, Barrel Length: 3 1/2, Finish: Nickel, SN: 56002

Question:
Date of manufacture

Answer:
Tristan- BUMMER! Someone finally asks about an Iver Johnson, and I cannot find the book on Iver Johnson I got for just such an occasion! As a wild guess I would say circa 1895-1925. Sorry. John Spangler



16033  - Oddball Trapdoor = M1905 Fencing Musket
8/10/2019
Rick Downers Grove IL.

Maker: Springfield, Model: M1879 Trapdoor, Caliber: 45-70, Barrel Length: 24 3/8'', Finish: Blue, SN: 192424

Question:
This gun is identical to my M1879 except barrel length and oal which is 43 1/2''. The barrel is crowned like any other Trapdoor. Dimensionally from rear barrel band to buttplate is correct. Also from upper barrel band to muzzle is correct. Between them is shorter. The stock is not pieced together. The fit of the barrel band keepers, nose cap etc. is perfect, everything is just like a typical rifle. The rear sight is a carbine sight, the front is the typical front sight. The (2) odd features are 1. A bayonet lug inline with front sight 90 degrees on the right and 2. the front barrel band is not drilled for either a stacking swivel or sling.

Answer:
Rick- If you check, you will find that your rifle is exactly the same length overall as a M1903 Springfield. To avoid damage to service rifles, the Ordnance Department made about 1,500 special ``Fencing Muskets`` from obsolete (and already paid for) .45-70 trapdoor rifles, circa 1905-1906. They removed the sights, hammer and thumb latch and ground the tumbler, camshaft, sling swivels, and extractors flush to avoid injury to soldiers. Sometimes lead rods were placed in the barrels to match the weight of the M1903 rifles. In 1905 they started making the version you have, with the lug on the right side of the barrel, but without any front sight. Some trapdoor bayonets had the blade ground down to just a thin strip and heat treaded to be more spring like, and a padded leather tip added. With the lug on the right side, the bayonet blade would be oriented underneath the barrel, just as the M1903 rod bayonet and later M1905 knife bayonet. Not a lot of these early circa 1905 fencing muskets were made, and fewer survive as most were broken up for parts, or turned into shooters like yours. Obviously yours has had the hammer and other essential parts replaced and a front sight added.

There was also a later version of the fencing musket with the same alterations except instead of using a socket type bayonet and lug on the barrel, they used bayonets with two crossguards which slipped over the barrel and were secured by screws into holes in the barrel. About 14,000 of these were made and they are seen fairly often, and there are 3 or 4 different variations of bayonets to go on them. Collectors should have one of everything. The later ones are much harder to convert back to shooters as the barrels have to be cut off behind the screw holes for attaching the bayonets, leaving only about 21 inches of barrel, too short for an accurate copy of a carbine.

Although fencing muskets are scarce, M1903 collectors do not seem to have the refined taste to appreciate their historic merits, so I don`t know if you are better off just enjoying it as a shooter, or getting rid of the added front sight and converting it back into fencing musket configuration. John Spangler




16086  - Historical Information For A Luger
8/10/2019
John, New Milford, NJ

Maker: Gesichert, Model: Luger, Caliber: 9mm, Barrel Length: 3'', Finish: Don`t Know, SN: 3860

Markings:
1936 on slide and 60 on slide, 3860 on barrel

Question:
This pistol was recovered from a German Soldier (year unknown) either pre or during WWII. Is there any way to trace it to whom it was issued to?

Answer:
John, Gesichert is the German word for safe, not the manufacturer of your Luger. The pistol is designed so that the word Gesichert is visible when the safety is in the on position, thus indicating that the safety is turned on and the pistol is "safe".

Your Luger should be marked with ``S/42`` this was a WW-II German ordnance code assigned to Mauser-Werke AG, Oberndorff am Neckar, Germany. It is found on Mauser manufactured Lugers that are dated from 1936 to 1939.

Lugers with the S/42 code should also have the following markings:

  • The serial number: stamped on the forward left side of the receiver, upper front of the frame, beneath the rear of the barrel, and on the base of the magazine.
    • The last two digits of the serial number should be stamped on most of the small parts.
  • S/42 stamped on the forward toggle:
  • The four digit year of manufacture-1936 through 1939 on the Receiver-above the chamber: .
  • The word GELADEN, meaning loaded and visible when a cartridge is in the chamber stamped on the left side of the extractor.
  • The bore size stamped beneath the rear of the barrel. This will be either 8.80, 8.81, 8.82, 8.83, or 8.84 millimeters.
  • Eagle over 63 military acceptance stamp stamped twice on the forward right side of the receiver, once on the top left side of the barrel one half inch from the receiver, and once on the base of the magazine.
  • Eagle, or eagle over swastika in a circle military test proof stamped on the forward right side of the receiver, the left side of the breech block, and the rear right side of the barrel.

Questions like yours, trying to get information on who German military arms were issued to come up quite often. As far as I have been able to find, all records of this type do not exist. Sorry that I can not be of more assistance. Marc



16085  - Winchester 1890 Value
8/6/2019


Maker: Winchester, Model: 90, Caliber: 22, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Question:
I have a Winchester Model 90 pump action 22 rimfire. Has octagon barrel. Per your website date finder, it has man. date of 1928. Serial # 773218. Would like some idea of its value. Is in good condition. Even if you can only give a range that would be very helpful. Thank you.

Answer:
The Model 1890 was Winchester`s first slide action repeating rifle, it was introduced to replace the .22 caliber model 1872. The model 1890 was popular due to the fact that it was both inexpensive and very well made. Model 1890`s are sometimes called ``gallery rifles`` because they were used almost universally in shooting galleries of the era. Approximately 849,000 model 1890`s were made between 1890 and 1932.

The blue book lists values for standard Winchester 1890 rifles manufactured from 1919-1932 (starting at serial number approx. 610,000) between about $250 and about $3000 depending on condition and features. Marc




16030  - Roberts .58 Caliber Conversion Of Savage Musket In Canada
8/6/2019
Terry. Boiestown, New Brunswick, Canada

Maker: Savage, Model: Unknown, Caliber: .577, Barrel Length: 27 1/2, Finish: Don`t Know, SN: NO NUMBER ON IT

Markings:
Has the U.S military marking as well as Savage R.T.A Co. Middleton Ct. 1864 Other side has Robert`s PAT June, 11, 1867 single action lever possibly 57 snider. No serial numbers on it.

Question:
Trying to figure out what it is. Reached out to several experts and dealers with no luck

Answer:
You have a Roberts conversion of a U.S. Model 1861 or 1863 .58 caliber rifle musket. Lockplates could be from any of the makers as they used surplus arms to make the conversions. Invented by Brigadier General B.S. Roberts of the U.S. Army, about 5,000 were converted by Providence Tool Company, Providence, RI circa 1868. The New York national guard ordered 5,000 of these in 1868 and work was well underway when the N.Y. politicians, ever corrupt and unreliable, refused to pay for them and Roberts had to find other buyers which included several state militias. New York then ordered 10,000 Remington Rolling Block rifles, to be made in Ilion, NY, the location of which I am sure had nothing to do with the Legislature`s shift in arms orders.

The Roberts uses a .58 caliber centerfire cartridge which is a bit shorter than the .577 Snider, but probably close enough on most regards that the Snider will work in the Roberts with no alteration needed.

The 27.5`` barrel is much shorter than original unaltered 40 inch length, probably shortened by a former owner or a dealer trying to make it a more convenient length with no regard for collector interest. But, collectors don`t care much about these anyway, so no big loss. John Spangler




16083  - Remington Mosin Nagant Ident
8/3/2019
Helene, Webb City, MO

Maker: Remington Armory 1918 Mosin Nagant, Model: Mosin Nagant, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Don`t Know, SN: 87563 - REMINGTON ARMORY SERIAL NUMBER

Question:
Hello, We would love your thoughts on how this gun came to be.The part we know for sure is that the top of the gun says Remington Armory 1918, serial number 87563. We were told it is a Mosin Nagant. But the end of the but of the gun has a Winchester Repeating Arms Co. plate. When looking at the Remington Mosin Nagant, the wood but and body that closest matches what we have looks like the ones used in Imperial Russia. But when looking at Winchester model 67A, bolt-action chambered .22 long rifle...we would say this looks very similar to the body of what we have. I can send photos if interested. We would appreciate your thoughts on what could possible be the story of this gun and if you believe it might have seen service. Thank you very much.

Answer:
Helene, Remington manufactured the Mosin Nagant rifle between 1915 and 1918. The February Revolution and October Revolution in Russia in 1917 brought governments that were less eager to pay for the continued war effort. Shipments of rifles continued to the Kerensky government, but payments to Remington ceased. The government of the United States, fearing bankruptcy of a critical arms manufacturer, bought the remaining stock of Mosin Nagant rifles from Remington beginning in late 1917, after the communists ousted the Kerensky government.

Given the information you have provided, it is likely that your rifle did not see service in the Great War. This rifle dates to the period when the United States purchased these rifles from Remington and used them to arm second line troops. If the original stock is present, this may be confirmed by the presence of a screaming eagle and a US ordinance bomb stamped into the stock just above the magazine well.

These rifles were often butchered by Bubba`s looking for a cheap bambi blaster after the war. I expect that your rifle has been sporterized, and the stock has been contored to a new pattern. Then, a Winchester butt was placed on the gun to give it a new and unique appearance, pleasing to the eye of a discriminating Bubba. Without pictures we would not be able to comment further on the value or originality of the gun.




16029  - Harrington & Richardson 755 Sahara Bolt Problem
8/3/2019
Steve Farris Staunton Va.

Maker: Harrington And Richardson, Model: 755-Sahara, Caliber: 22 Cal.S.L.LR, Barrel Length: 18 Inch, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Question:
I inherited this Sahara from my grandma as bolt was stuck forward I cleaned and oil till I free it so I took out to clean proper and had to depress spring to be bolt in and now spring is stuck in depress position. is there a trick to get it to release?

Answer:
Steve- I have never messed with one of those, but these were inexpensive guns with rather simple parts. Numrich a good parts diagram available, along with some parts at

https://www.gunpartscorp.com/gun-manufacturer/hr/rifles-hr/755

It looks like most of their springs are coil type, and these usually operate with a rod or plunger in the center, or in a hole. Problems come when dirt from firing or rust builds up keeping the spring stuck in one position. I recommend you take it apart again and carefully clean away all the dirt of rust. If a coil spring is stuck in a hole, you will need some sort of hook to reach down and pull it out. You can make one from a piece of coat hanger by bending the tip, and maybe doing a bit of file work to get a hook edge on it small enough to fit inside the spring, but with enough sticking out to help pull the spring out. Rust can be removed by scraping with a knife blade, or you might need to work on it with a nail file or emery board or sharpening stone. Generally, a good cleaning will fix most problems.

Although not a very valuable gun, it should have some sentimental value coming from your grandmother, and I hope your family appreciates that, and once you get it working again that they can enjoy shooting it. Your section of the country has a very long history of firearms use, in addition to being a truly beautiful area, and you should enjoy it. John Spangler