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15768  - 1889 Brazil
4/21/2018
Scott, Hot Springs, NC,

Maker: Bolt Action 5 Shot Brazil, Model: 1889 Brazil, Caliber: 30/06, Barrel Length: 36''?, Finish: Blue, SN: 205.....?

Markings:
My rifle is at my dads, I just bought it. It has the coat of arms of Brazil Nov 1889 seal on top of the barrel where the cartridge goes in the bolt. If I had it I would list the serial number. The only numbers I remember on it besides the seal, is 30.04. It also has raised adjustable sights for yardage.

Question:
What is the value, I will get the serial numbers ASAP, I know that would be more exact. Mostly want to fire it, and I was wondering if it would be safe to shoot it? The barrel and bolt are in great shape and the stock is also.

Answer:
Scott- Brazil adopted the Mauser Bold action rifles as early as 1894 and went through several newer models as they were developed. Nearly all have the Brazilian crest on the receiver ring, and the 1889 date reflects the date (November 15, 1889) the old colonial monarch Pedro II was overthrown by a military coup led by General Fonseca, who became the country's first de facto president. But, the 1889 has nothing to do with the actual rifle Model. Brazil used many different Mauser models, most in 7 x 57mm Mauser caliber but also some in 6.5mm Portuguese and 8 x 57mm Mauser. After WW2 Brazil converted may of their older rifles to .30-06 caliber, and those with the long barrels (about 29 inches long) were originally the Model 1908, but after the barrel was replaced (or rebored?) to handle .30-06 ammunition they were known as the Model 1908/34. These were well made guns with quality materials and generally well cared for. I would expect them to be safe to fire, but only a competent gunsmith can tell you for sure. Value depends on condition and other minor details collectors are interested in, but the Model 1908/34 rifles seem to sell in the $400-600 retail range in typical condition. John Spangler



15792  - Tipico 32
4/21/2018
Ed Averill Park, NY

Maker: Tipico, Model: ?, Caliber: .32, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: 213542

Markings:
-GT- 32 Long CTG -SC- Made in Spain

Question:
Can you give me the year of this revolver please

Answer:
Ed, I have not been able to find any information on this particular manufacturer. My guess is that you have one of the Spanish Smith and Wesson copies which were imported into the United States in the first half of the 20th century. There were several companies in Spain manufacturing this type of revolver during that time. Information about individual makers is often hard to find.

The Spanish Smith and Wesson copies have a reputation in general for making use of low quality, steel which may not be strong enough to handle modern day high - pressure loads. My advise would be to retire this weapon and not fire it. Marc




15767  - 1892 Winchester Oklahoma Highway Patrol
4/17/2018
Jim, Topeka, Ks

Maker: Winchester, Model: 1892, Caliber: 44-40, Barrel Length: 24?, Finish: Blue, SN: 871395

Markings:
The original stock has been refinished but still contains what is left of a Black Ink Stamp... It previously had a readable stamp of: ''Oklahoma Highway Patrol #214 I believe.

Question:
Is there possibly any ''history'' of this 1892? It does have ''5'' little notches carved on the receiver as if to signify ''5'' Kills!

Answer:
Jim- You could order a letter from the Cody Firearms Museum which would show the date it was shipped, but not much more than that. I doubt if the OK Highway Patrol would have any records, so you are pretty much left with what can be learned from the gun itself. As for the “notches indicating kills” stuff, I think that whole thing is a bunch of nonsense, although others may disagree. It may be nothing more than someone making an easy to see feature to readily distinguish one gun from other in a rack instead of trying to remember serial numbers. But, who knows, maybe some OKHP trooper did use it to take out scumbag criminals. Some collectors really like all types of law enforcement firearms, but other collectors would be unhappy with the notches and refinished stock. That’s about all I can tell you on this one. John Spangler



15790  - Manhattan Arms 12 Gage
4/17/2018
Ron , Marshfield ,Ma USA

Maker: Manhattan Arms, Model: Single Barrel Shotgun, Caliber: 12 Gage, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Rusty, SN: 97307

Markings:
cannot see because the metal has black dust coating it .

Question:
This old shotgun was found in a wall of an old building in Marshfield MA. How old is it and what is the history of it.

Answer:
Ron, Flayderman`s Guide has a little on Manhattan Arms Co. (no shoguns are listed) but the real book (and only one) is "Manhattan Firearms" by Waldo Nutter. Unfortunately it is out of print and going for about $100 or more when you find one. The Manhattan name was used by other firms later. A quick Google search brought me to a web site that is dedicated to collecting Manhattan Firearms: http://www.manhattanfirearms.com/, they indicate the following on their FAQ page:

Manhattan Firearms Company did not make any Shotguns. They only made pistols. According to reference book "Shotgun Markings 1865 to 1940, A List" compiled by Joseph T. Vorisek: Manhattan Arms Co shotguns were made by the following manufacturers:

  • Neumann Feres until 1903 if Belgian made
  • F. Dumoulin 1903 and after if Belgian made
  • J.P. Sauer if German made
  • Harrington & Richardson if single gun
  • Hunter Arms Company if U.S. made hammerless double

They were all sold by Schoverling, Daley & Gates.

If the above information is correct, it looks like your shotgun was manufactured by Harrington & Richardson and sold by Schoverling, Daley & Gates. Hope that this helps. Marc



15789  - Jukar 45
4/14/2018
Nancy, Forest Hill, MD

Maker: Jukar Spain, Model: ?, Caliber: 45, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Other, SN: 037627

Question:
Trying to determine the value of this antique long gun.

Answer:
Nancy- Jukar was a name used on inexpensive reproductions imported in the late 20th century. They have NO collector value and little appeal to shooters other than for their usually modest prices. I see them priced at various levels, but think that less than $100 is realistic for rifles and less than $50 for pistols, and if I had one to sell, I would not refuse any offer! Marc



15765  - Nagant 7 Shot Service Revolver
4/14/2018
Larry California

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
My grandfather escaped from the Imperial Army of Russia in 1913 with a Nagant 7 shot single action service revolver. .

I'm only interested to know what the manufacturer's selling price might have been sometime between 1900 and 1913. .

Could you hazard a rough estimate ? Please advise. Thanks, Larry

Answer:
Larry- The 1908 Sears Roebuck catalog lists probably 25 different revolvers for sale at prices ranging from $9.00 to $14.00. Military contracts, especially when executed by government armories usually would result in a nominal price somewhat less than similar items made for the commercial market, and military made arms were not released for commercial sales although they sometimes allowed private purchase by officers or politicians. .

There are a ton of Nagant revolvers on the market at modest prices, but a very early example which has not been arsenal overhauled is a very nice collector item worth a lot more than the common refinished ones, as well as having sentimental value for family members. Hope that helps. John Spangler




15787  - Winchester Model 1892 Value
4/10/2018
Jack

Maker: Winchester, Model: Model 1892, Caliber: 25-20, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Don`t Know, SN: 314574

Question:
Approximate Value?

Answer:
Jack, over one million Winchester Model 1892 rifles were manufactured between 1892 and 1941, my records indicate that the year of manufacture for your rifle, serial number 314574 is 1905. The model was first listed in the July 1892 Winchester catalog and factory records indicate that the first delivery to warehouse stock was made on May 3, 1892. The Model 1892 was devised as a companion rifle that would chamber popular center fire handgun calibers 44-40, 38-40, and 32-20. The 25-20 chambering was developed especially for this model and was added in August 1895. The 1892 was the same basic design as the earlier Model 1886 with a slightly simplified mechanism and some component parts scaled down in size to handle the smaller handgun calibers. Winchester offered the Model 1892 in several different configurations:

The 1892 carbine was manufactured from 1893-1941, it usually had a straight wrist butt, a band around the forend, and a round 20in barrel. "Trappers Carbines" were also offered with 12-18 inch barrels. Carbine production continued in 25-20 and 44-40 calibers even after 1892 rifle production had been abandoned.

The 1892 Fancy Sporting Rifle was manufactured from 1892-1930, it had a fancy pistol grip buttstock and could be ordered in any of the standard barrel styles with full or half length magazine.

The 1892 Musket was manufactured from 1898-1903, it had a 30 inch barrel, a straight-wrist buttstock, three barrel bands, a nose cap and swivels.

The 1892 Sporting Rifle was manufactured from 1892-1932, the standard pattern had a straight-wrist butt, a concave shoulder plate, and a 24in round, octagon or half-octagon barrel.

The 1892 Take Down Rifle was announced in the autumn of 1893, but very few were ever manufactured.

The Model 1892 was immensely popular both in the United States and for many years throughout South America, Australia, and the Far East, it was the second Winchester model to pass the one million production mark. The millionth 1892 rifle (chambered in 32-20) was engraved and presented to the United States Secretary of War, Patrick Hurley, on December 17, 1932. Admiral Robert E. Peary carried a Model 1892 carbine on his trips to the North Pole.

Blue book Model 1892 values range from $150 to over $2500 depending on condition, year of manufacture and configuration. Marc



15757  - Spencer Gun Company Shotgun
4/10/2018
Jeremy, Heartland, Texas

Maker: Spencer Gun Co., Model: Uncertain, Caliber: 12, Barrel Length: 29-7/8'', Finish: Blue, SN: X G 2 64

Markings:
Spencer Gun Co.on side of side of receiver. Choke Bored stamped on top of barrel. X G 2 64 stamped behind trigger guard

Question:
Can y`all tell me what year is it, who actually made it, is it a damacus barrel. Is it Chambered for 2 - /2'' shells? Any info would be appreciated

Answer:
Your shotgun has nothing to do with the Civil War inventor Christopher M. Spencer and his lever action carbine (although the sellers may have hoped buyers might think this was an indicator that this was a good gun). It was actually made by Cresecnt Firearms Company as a “house brand” for sale by the Hibbard, Bartlett and Spencer Hardware Company of Chicago in the early 1900s. I do not know if these were Damascus or solid steel barrels, but am pretty sure they were for 12 GA shells less than today’s standard 2 ¾ inch length. Frankly, I think all of the Crescent made guns are unsuitable for shooting, if not downright unsafe. John Spangler



15750  - Old 16 Gauge Pheasant Gun By W. Allport
4/7/2018
James Kaufman

Maker: OLD, Model: Pheasant Gun 16 Gauge, Caliber: 16 Gauge, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Markings:
Thank you sooo much for the information. It is the exact gun that you think it is. It was made by W. Allport out of Briningham England and was a conversion from one technology to the next. I found someone else with a similar gun. What is this gun worth? A range would be great. It is in really good condition and has all the checkering and has a butt base plate that is well engraved and a even better finger guard with much engraving. Unfortunately it has a small crack in the wood and a replaced push rod. I am guessing it is 1820 to 1840. London marked on the barrel long ways. hexagonal barrel that transitions into a circular barrel. I was told it was worth between $1500 to $2500 depending on the auction and that I should auction it in London.

Question:
What is it worth. I just need a large range. I have offers from $300 to $700 but was told by the largest gun shop in American. Collectors FArms, that it was worth $2000K ish.

Answer:
James- The Allport family of gunmakers included five men, working between 1870 and 1892. William worked 1807-1823 at 6 Whittall Street in Birmingham, so we can date your gun to that period. At that time it would have been made as a flintlock since percussion ignition system was barely in its infancy by the time Allport died in 1823. From your description it sounds like a typical fowling piece of the early 19th century of reasonably nice quality. During its period of use it was updated to use percussion caps, probably circa 1830-1840 when that became the norm for new firearms and economically feasible to convert older arms.

As far as value, Collectors Firearms is a reputable outfit and I would defer to their opinion if they actually examined the gun. (NOTE- There are two companies with that name, one in Houston, TX and the other in Galesburg, IL, and both have good reputations.) Without seeing the gun, and knowing there is a crack, my guess would be that it would be worth more like $300-750 retail, but that is no more helpful than trying to guess the value of my old Ford without seeing it. It will all boil down to how badly someone wants to buy it and how badly you want to sell. There is not a big demand for these, so if someone is willing to pay anything like $600 I recommend you take it, unless you want to pass it along to your heirs. John Spangler




15785  - EMGE .177
4/7/2018
Peter Vermeulen Auck New Zealand the Gun German

Maker: EMGE, Model: ZELLA MEHLIS, Caliber: ? .177, Barrel Length: 125 Mm, Finish: Rusty, SN: LOTS OF NUMBERS AND SYMBOLS ALL OVER IT

Markings:
Has allot of writing all over it mainly German and symbols etc 1936 we believe. Foreign Make. Zenit. -GT- Em-Ge -LT- Zella-Mehlis(Thun) Has Patent in bold writing and a ship type symbol with Germany within it.

Question:
Could you please tell me more about more about this pistol and what it may be worth.

Answer:
Jeff- Moritz & Gerstenberger operated in Zella Mehlis, Germany, they made a variety of blank firing guns, and other products including spring or air guns sold under several names including Herkules, Krone and Zenit.

Moritz and Gerstenberger began their partnership in 1922 or 1923, and received a patent for their “signal” pistol in 1926. They continued in business until at least 1939 and used the maker code “ghk” for German military production during WW2, although it is unclear what they produced.

It is hard to give a value without seeing the gun but my guess is that a rusty EMGE would sell in the $30 or less range here in the USA. Values will probably be different in New Zealand. Marc




15764  - German WW 105 Mm Shells
4/3/2018
Murray Massachusetts

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
In a memoir, my deceased uncle described working in an ordnance factory making German shells in Poland as a slave laborer around 1943. He said that he had to pull them out of an oven and line them up on sand for cooling. He had to work fast or risk being burnt. If one fell over, and caused others to fall like dominos, he would be accused of sabotage and beaten. .

He says they were 105mm shells. Could that be correct? Does this sound credible? I can only find 105's that were 6 inches tall. That doesn't sound tall enough to fall over. Perhaps a different size? Thank you! Murray

Answer:
Murray- The Germans (and many other nations including the U.S.) used 105mm artillery pieces of various designs. There were different types of shells (projectiles) for different purposes but in general they all would run about 30-35 pounds and 18-20 inches long and 4 inches (105mm) diameter. .

The 105mm refers to the diameter of the projectiles, and in Germany it would usually have been expressed as 10.5 centimeters. These were used in short barreled howitzers and long barreled guns (artillery pieces) and were the German heavy anti-aircraft guns with a bit more range than the famous and very effective "Flak 88" 88mm (8.8cm) guns. They also made 105mm ammo to use in the thousands of guns they captured from the French, Czechs, Poles, etc. .

Here is a link to a WW2 German video showing some shell forging: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kvp6BO_tnpQ .

It might be more in context if you view a modern Serbian video first that explains the process at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akAQ5s4-Tp0 .

I can also send a diagram from a manual showing a German made 105mm projectile (this one for use in captured Italian guns). Hope that helps. John Spangler




15782  - S&W Model 12
4/3/2018
Lisa

Maker: Smith & Wesson, Model: 12 I Think, Caliber: .38, Barrel Length: 5, Finish: Blue, SN: C583891

Question:
How much is my gun worth? Thank you!

Answer:
Lisa, The Smith & Wesson Model 12 was Produced from 1952 – 1986. It was a double-action revolver built on the round or square butt K alloy service frame with five screws, similar to the Model 10 but made with an alloy frame and originally an alloy cylinder. The alloy cylinder was later changed to steel due to problems with cylinders cracking. A short action model was also built on the KA frame with a 6-shot fluted cylinder.

Revolvers were offered in blue or nickel finish, with a serrated ramp front sight with square notch fixed rear sight. Barrel lengths of 2, 4, 5 and 6 inches were listed in the S&W catalog but the 5 and 6 inch variations were possibly not in actual production as they are never found.

Original grips were checkered walnut Magna style with diamond around the screw escutcheon and S&W medallions.

Blue book values for Model 12 revolvers range from around $75 to over $400 depending on condition. Marc.