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16207  - UNIDENTIFIED RIMFIRE CARTRIDGE
8/8/2020
Colin M, Vancouver B.C. Canada

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Don`t Know, SN: ?

Markings:
Dual rim fire shell. Length 1 1/2 - rim width 5/8 - casing width 9/16

Question:
I found this 6 inches in the ground while metal detecting in a field and I could not identify the caliber or maker of this shell, and when was this ammunition used?

Answer:
Colin- I cannot ID this item based on the info provided. Photos would help, or more precise measurements, It sounds like it would be about .52 to .56 caliber. Since found in Canada, it would be reasonable to expect it to be a cartridge commonly used in Canada. My initial guess was maybe .577 snider, but they are about 2`` long and centerfire, One of the .50, .52 or .56 rimfire Spencer cartridges would be my second guess, but they are all too short. When Lou Behling gets his definitive book on rimfire cartridges complete, we will probably find the answer there. But, not until then. John Spangler



16334  - Benjamin Model H
8/8/2020
Austin

Maker: Benjamin Franklin Pellet Gun, Model: H, Caliber: 177, Barrel Length: 19 Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: 33XXX

Markings:
None

Question:
Would like a price on what it is worth and any information you may have on used Benjamin Air Rifles.

Answer:
Austin ,I don't have much experience with air rifles (I liked them when I was a kid, but lost all interest in them when Dad gave me my first Remingtion pump .22 rifle). The gun value book describes the Benjamin Model H (no mention is made of any Benjamin Franklin brand name) as being a pump action with walnut grips that will fire a pellet at 400 FPS. Model H values are in the $50.00 range if the gun is in excellent condition... Marc



16206  - SMITH & WESSON .38 SPECIAL
8/4/2020
Patrick, Rendon, Texas USA

Maker: S&W 38 Special Revolver, Model: 1890, Caliber: 38 Special, Barrel Length: 5”, Finish: Blue, SN: 357580

Markings:
Serial number 357580

Question:
You I have a Smith and Wesson .38 special CTG, circa 1890 that belonged to my great great grandfather , a US deputy Marshal in old ham county, Texas. I also have the holster and his badge. There is no military and police designation marked on the revolver. I do have a lone serial number of 357580 on the butt plate at the bottom of the pistol grip. This is the only number on the revolver. On the barrel it says simply Smith and Wesson where the cylinder releases. On the other side of the barrel it says 38 S&W special CTG. That is all the writing on it with exception of trademark stamp.

Answer:
Patrick- I cannot help from your description. There were a number of mostly foreign makers who made guns and prominently marked the .38 S&W CRTG (or similar) hoping that buyers would think the gun was made by S&W, not that it merely took a S&W caliber cartridge.

It sounds like a neat bunch of gear and it is good to see it stay in the family. John Spangler




16326  - Stain 1909 Argentine Handguard?
8/4/2020
Erl Schmiesing Erlschhlnd@aol.com

Maker: Mauser, Model: 1909 Argentine, Caliber: 7.65 Mm, Barrel Length: 29.13 In, Finish: Blue And Bright Bolt/reciever, SN: E XXXX

Markings:
All numbers match including muzzle cap, gun appears as issued and bore is very bright. Gun was in the grease when I purchased.

Question:
The stock is dark walnut and the upper handguard is a much lighter color. were any of these guns issued with mis-matched wood? should I restain the handguard to match?

Answer:
Erl, it is hard to say whether or not your handguard is original to rifle, over the years the handguard could have been switched for a thousand different reasons. Check for matching numbers, your 1909's handguard may have a number stamped underneath in the barrel channel. If the mis-match in color bothers you I would see nothing wrong with staining your handguard darker... Marc



16201  - SHARPS NM 1863 CARBINE VALUE
8/1/2020
Thomas, Staten Island, NY

Maker: Sharps, Model: 1863 New Model, Caliber: 53, Barrel Length: 22 Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: C18136

Markings:
R.S. Lawrence 1859

Question:
I am interested in selling my firearm and was inquiring as to the approximate value? Thank You, Thomas J Marino

Answer:
Thomas- It is hard to put a specific value on a gun we have not seen in person, or at least through some good photos. There is no documented historic usage for that serial number, although some nearby numbers were in the hands of various Union cavalry units as early as September 1864, so it probably saw similar use, but exactly what unit, where and when will forever remain a mystery. The Sharps carbine was one of the most widely used cavalry arms of the Civil War, relatively easy to load either mounted or dismounted, and they were available in quantity. There were some better breechloaders using self contained metallic cartridges which saw less use, mainly because the guns were in short supply, and ammunition for those was hard to get.

Value will depend on condition and any alterations, since there is no historical factor in the equation for this number. I see similar guns typically selling at gun shows or auctions in the range of $1,000-2,000 retail range. A doggy example would bring less, and a pristine one would bring more.

Hope that helps. John Spangler




16325  - Shotgun- J.P. Lovell, English Made
8/1/2020
Tammy

Maker: 10ga Shotgun, Model: ????, Caliber: 10ga, Barrel Length: 28¨, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
10ga Side by Side shotgun Markings England John P. Lovell Arms Co. Boston MA. Eurema Gun Fine Damascus all three of these markings are in the ribbing between the barrels Hammers need to be cocked before firing All metal parts are highly scrolled. There is a projection off the top of the barrels that fits into the stock like a puzzle piece. Underside of the barrels have the folowing markings 11 then what looks like two crossed swords with a crown and diamonds. the swords and diamonds appear twice on each barrel. Next a large diamond shape with a 1o and a cin it on 1 side. and a large diamond with a 1o with a' on top of the o and a c. with the word choke next to the diamond. There are 2 indentations (symbol) next to the word choke on each ! barrel The right barrel has 3 notches on the inside evenly spaced at the backend of the barrel. The left side is smooth. There are also the letters JPD stamped on the stock and barrel butt suspect these maybe my great great grandfathers initials. What is the meaning of the choke markings and the notched in the barrel. Also any history and or information of this type of gun.

Answer:
Tammy- all the markings you describe on the bottom of the barrels are normal English proofmarks. The choke markings indicate that the barrels are slightly smaller diameter at the muzzle than normal. "Choked" barrels keep the shot pellets from spreading quite as much as they otherwise would, theoretically making it possible to get kills at slightly longer ranges. (Just the opposite of pirate blunderbusses where the wide part at the end of the barrel is intended to spread the shot to get more kills at close range.) I cannot explain the notches on the inside of the right barrel. Since the right barrel is usually the first one fired, it may be that the extractor that pulls the fired shell out got worn and these were put there to make it easier to pry the shell out with a knife or something. Just a guess... John P. Lovell Arms Co. operated in Boston from 1890 to 1897, the last of several companies involving Lovell which had started business around 1840. Unlike the Belgian shotguns frequently mentioned on these question and answer pages, your English made gun was a higher grade piece, and much better made. Your great-grandfather had good taste, and invested a little more money for his gun. However, due to their "laminated or Damascus" barrels, they are considered to be unsafe to fire. Therefore the value is not great, and it is an interesting family heirloom. Enjoy it and take care of it... Marc Wade