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16422  - Briklee Refurbished 1896 Mauser
1/26/2021
Mark@Vitesse.com

Maker: Mauser, Model: Construktion 1896, Caliber: 7.63 Mm Mauser, Barrel Length: 5.5¨, Finish: Blued, SN: 593XXX

Markings:
WAFFENFABRIK MAUSER OBERNDORF A. NECKER

Question:
1) What is the date of manufacture of this pistol?2) All parts are matching. The pistol has been refurbished by Briklee and has a small ring of silver solder around the new barrel extension. I have heard that Pro Blue will hind the solder ring. Is this true? What will hide the solder ring.

Answer:
Mark, My records indicate that your 1896 Mauser was manufactured in 1930. I have never used Pro Blue, so I can't give you much advise on using it to darken silver solder joints. If you try to use any touchup blue to darken the silver solder joint on your Mauser, be very careful because some touchup bluing solutions can actually remove or discolor the existing finish. I have seen people use dark navy blue paint and a fine artist's paint brush to hide solder joints, you might try that method if the Pro Blue doesn't work... Marc



16421  - General Viljoen Rifle
1/26/2021
Andy Tucson AZ

Maker: Winchester, Model: 1895, Caliber: .30 30-40 Krag, Barrel Length: 24, Finish: Other - Blue, SN: 72425

Question:
Hi there - this gun has been in the family I married the last surviving Viljoen and were now selling it - reserve not met so I can cancel this auction anytime now. Issue is that Im trying to trace the serial number to his location - as third party evidence of General Viljoen owning this rifle -- we dont have any original purchase receipt. Do you know if there are any archivists who have access to old Winchester sales records Thanks. Andy GibbsThe listing is currently here FYI httpswww.gunbroker.comitem890397163

Answer:
Andy- Sorry, we cannot help with that. Winchester shippingrecords are located at the Cody Firearms Museum, and for a fee theycan provide a letter telling when it was shipped, and any details onconfiguration which were not standard, but not much more. Afterthat the trail gets cold very quickly.

People who have expertise (which we do not) in South African or BoerWar history, or specialized Winchester researchers may have someinformation, but I doubt it.

This will remain one of thousands of guns with a very interestingoral history, but without documentary verification, a prospectivebuyer will have to determine what value they place on thathistory.

Since this rifle in in U.S. .30 Model 1903 caliber, it was madeafter its purported owner`s involvement in the Boer War was over,and most collectors would likely place a much lower value on a gun``owned by`` a veteran than one which was ``used by`` the same personduring the war.

Perhaps it would be most appreciated if it remained in the familywhere sentimental value can outweigh the retail value to others. But, sadly, many families lack anyone interested in preservinghistoric items.

Good luck with your sale. John Spangler




16420  - Mauser Model 1871 11mm Rifle
1/23/2021
Mike mikerud@blazenet.net

Maker: Mauser, Model: 71, Caliber: 11mm, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
Is this gun a rare model or is it fairly common. I would like to sell it but have no idea of its worth. Can you help me?

Answer:
Mike- There are several variations of the model 1871 Mauser. The true 1871 is a single shot, but the Model 1871/84 used a magazine. These were made in several variations- Infantry rifle with 33 inch barrel; Jaeger rifle with 29 inch barrel; and a Carbine and a short rifle, both with about 20 inch barrels. The infantry rifle is common, the others less so. If in nice condition, we could sell this for you and get you a good price. (We take consignments and normally get 20% of the final selling price. Lots of satisfied customers, so we must be doing it right. Let us know if you want us to handle it for you. We can identify it correctly, price it and advertise it, plus take it to various gun shows where collectors normally shop for this sort of stuff.) Hope this helps... John Spangler and Marc Wade



16418  - Remington Matchmaster Manufacture Date
1/23/2021
Daniel Mentor Ohio USA

Maker: Remington, Model: 513 S Matchmaster, Caliber: .22 Lr, Barrel Length: 27, Finish: Long Gun - Blue, SN: 126293

Markings:
Left side of barrel in front of receiver cB 27

Question:
I have looked at many pages regarding Rem date codes mine could have been made in April of 193319551981 it has tip off grooves on receiver and screw holes at end of barrel for a ramp though has a hooded Lyman dovetail now. Would like to know what date is most likely. Thank you Dan

Answer:
Daniel, The Remington 513 is a very good .22 long rifle bolt action target rifle. Production started in 1940, some 10,000 were purchased for military training use during WW2, and some 137,302 were made by the time production ended in 1968. Therefore, it looks like the barrel code for 1955 would be correct for the date of manufacture. John



16417  - Springfield 1863
1/19/2021
Rich Pagano Burlington NJ.

Maker: Springfield Armory, Model: 1863 Typpe I Riflemusket, Caliber: 58, Barrel Length: Standard Barrel, Finish: Long Gun - Other, SN: NO SN

Markings:
All furniture is armory standard however the barrel is completely unmarked. Noinspection or proof stamps nor does it have the eagle on bolster. Patena is consistant with the other metal furniture and does not show any filing or sanding cleaning efforts. Standard butt plate marked US but has an additional stamping Wm White centered above the US.

Question:
Since all the markings including the stock inspection stamps are Springfield Armory is it possible that the barrel was a field replacement or is it a gun that was assembled from armory surplus parts by the White Brothers surplus dealers in NYC Overall the gun is in fine to excellent condition. Look forward to your comments.

Answer:
Rich- Assuming the markings are related to a military goods dealer, the best place to check is ``American Military Goods Dealers and Makers`` by Burce Bazelon and William McGuinn, 1990. It is a revised edition of an earlier book with similar title by Bazelon alone, and the revised on basically adds a second volume to the first, in a single book.

White Brothers were a a uniform company in Pensacola, FL, early in the 20th century, primarily in the early days of Naval aviation. A family member, William White, provided some info on their business, but it does not sound like these people have anything to do with your musket.

There was a William H. White of Brooklyn, NY who contracted for 50,000 painted canvas haversacks on April 24, 1863, but little else is known about him but there was a painter of that name living on Fulton Street in 1862-1864, and another William White living on Huron Street in 1865 with no trade listed.

There are a couple of other dealers named White, but none with a William involved. I doubt if the markings are business related. It was common for many workmen in the late 19th century to have metal stamps with their name for marking tools and other personal property, and I suspect that it is some unknown William White, possibly a veteran of the War, maybe a GR member, or just an early gun collector who marked the gun- possibly after buying it from Bannerman. I have seen a number of other old guns with inexplicable names stamped on them. The lack of barrel markings strongly supports your belief that it was assembled from surplus parts, perhaps by Bannerman or one of his cooperative competitors who colluded to buy up military surplus at very low prices and divide it among themselves rather than bidding against each other and driving prices up.

Enjoy! John Spangler




16419  - Brazilian Contract Model 1917 S&W Revolver
1/19/2021
Nathan

Maker: Smith & Wesson, Model: Unknown Revolver, Caliber: 45 ACP, Barrel Length: Five And A Half Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Markings:
¨ S&W D.A. 45¨ stamped on barrel, on the right frame side, stamped, is an ornate star encircled with leaves, pierced by a sword, a banner below that with the words ¨ ESTADOS UNICOS DOBRAZIL 15 de NOVEMBRA de 1889¨ and the date 1937 below that.

Question:
Info wanted identifying S&W D.A. 45 cal. I've come into possession of a Smith & Wesson 45 caliber revolver and I'm interested in learning more about this firearm. I will be grateful for any information.

Answer:
Nathan, it sounds like you have a Brazilian contract model 1917 S&W revolver. Handguns chambered for 45 ACP were desperately needed once the USA had entered the First World War. To meet wartime demands, both S&W and Colt modified their standard large caliber revolvers to chamber 45 ACP. The S&W Mod. 1917 was just a Second Model .44 Hand Ejector chambered in .45ACP, with the cylinder shortened to accept the special half-moon clips required for speedy ejection of spent .45 ACP casings. In 1937 S&W accepted an order from the Brazilian government for 25,000 Model 1917's. The Brazilian contract S&W Model 1917 revolvers which were stamped with the Brazilian seal on the side plate, were delivered in October of 1938. Marc



16407  - Ithaca Model 600 SKB Japan
1/16/2021
Bob Sussex WI USA

Maker: Ithaca, Model: 600 Ou, Caliber: 12 Ga, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Long Gun - Don`t Know, SN: CM640951

Question:
3 questions-Can you change what barrel shoots 1st. -what year was it manufactured. What is it worth

Answer:
Bob, our main focus at FineOldGuns.com (OldGuns.net) is military firearms. We sometimes list sporting shotguns for sale in our catalogs but we do not have a lot of interest in collecting them and are by no means experts in this field. A quick internet search seems to indicate that this model was manufactured by SKB, here is some of the information that I found: ``In 68 SKB made a 600 that came with a checkered walnut stock with an engraved receiver and 28 or 30 inch barrels. It was in 2-3/4`` only but could be ordered with a 3`` chamber and the barrels had fixed chokes. The 30 inch barrels were full over imp mod, and the 28 was mod and improved mod, or full and mod but could be ordered with mod and Imp cyl or full and mod. They were about $200 when new and about the $600 range now if in good shape.`` It looks like one was listed in the Rock Island March 2018 auction with an estimated selling price of $500 to $800, click here to see their listing. Hope that this helps, Marc



16393  - SINGLE SHOT SHOTGUN BY C.S. SHATTUCK
1/16/2021
Heather

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
I received a gun from my father, that has no maker markings, only matching serial numbers on barrel and stock. How or where can I locate information on this gun? It is a single shot, break apart single barrel shot gun. Any direction you can give would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. I appreciate your taking time to look at these photos.

Answer:
Heather- I was finally able to identify your shotgun. It was made by the C.S. Shattuck Company of Hatfield, MA circa 1890-1909. These were made in 12 or 16 gauge with 30 inch barrels. These were made for black powder cartridges and are NOT SAFE to shoot with modern ammunition.

The use of the ``ring trigger`` or ``ring release`` is a very simple and cheap way to allow the barrel to be opened, but never really was very popular. The design is believed to be from O.F. Mossberg, who later started the Mossberg firearms company, and was licensed to Stevens around 1906 which soon forced Shattuck to stop using it.

Although old and interesting, there really is not much collector interest in these oddball, inexpensive shotguns. I would expect to find ones similar to this at a gun show or auction selling for $100 or less. Hope that helps. John Spangler




16405  - 1934 Beretta
1/12/2021
Chuck,Sheboygan,WI,USA,cpo

Maker: Beretta, Model: 1934, Caliber: 380, Barrel Length: 3 1/2, Finish: Blue, SN: 921XXX

Question:
Any technical information available? How old? Would like to know how to break it down for cleaning. thanks

Answer:
Chuck, The model 1934 Beretta was produced from 1934 to the late 1960's and was Italy's military weapon during WWII. Wartime 1934 Berettas (except for the late production models) have the year of manufacture stamped on the left hand side of the slide in Arabic numbers, and the Fascist date stamped in Roman numerals (the Fascist date is a combination of the Julian date and the Fascist calendar date which commenced in 1922). Military 1934 Berettas were stamped RE if the issued to the army, RA if the issued to the air force and RM if the issued to the navy. The 1934 was offered commercially but most pistols were procured by the Italian military during WWII. There is some collector interest in wartime 1934 Berettas and values will be in the $100 to $350 range depending upon condition and type of finish. To disassemble your 1934 Beretta.
1.Remove the magazine. Then draw the slide back and glance in the chamber to check that it is empty.
2. Turn the safety catch up to the rear or "safe" position.
3. Hold the pistol in the right hand. Push the slide back as far as it will go, using the left hand. When it is in its fully rear position, it will force the safety catch to jump up into a notch on the lower edge of the left side of the slide. This will hold the slide in rear position.
4. Holding the pistol firmly in the right hand, with the heel of the left hand push the barrel straight to the rear to disengage its locking lug from the recess in the receiver. It may now be lifted up by its breech end out of the long slot in the top of the slide.
5. Still holding the pistol in the right hand, grip the side of the slide firmly with the left hand and with the left thumb push the safety catch down to the Fully forward or "fire" position. This will release the slide and permit it to come forward on the receiver guides and off to the front.
6. The recoil spring and its rod may now be removed.
7. The safety catch can be shaken out of the left side of the receiver.
8. Removing the stocks will expose the lockwork for cleaning or necessary repairs.
Assembling:
1. Replace the safety catch and turn it to its rear or "safe" position.
2. Replace the recoil spring and its rod, making sure that the collar on the rod is to the rear in the receiver well.
3. Start the slide onto the receiver from the front end and push it steadily back. When it is in the fully rear position, the safety catch will engage in the notch in the side of the slide and will thereby hold the slide back.
4. Replace the barrel by inserting the muzzle through the top of the opening in the slide and push it forward until the lug below the firing chamber section of the barrel engages in its recess in the receiver.
5. Holding the pistol securely in the right hand, grip the slide firmly with the left hand and with the left thumb push the safety catch to the firing position. This will permit you to ease the slide forward under tension of the recoil spring.
6. Holding onto the hammer, press the trigger to lower it.
Inserting the magazine completes the assembly...Marc




16415  - Herters XK3
1/12/2021
Jason Eden Utah US

Maker: Herters, Model: XK3, Caliber: 30 06, Barrel Length: 24, Finish: Long Gun - Blue, SN: 10129

Markings:
Red Diamond inlays in the stock

Question:
Where was the rifle made Any other details I can get on it. Are the inlays factory What year was it manufactured

Answer:
Jason- Herters was an interesting company which sprung on the scene circa 1960 with an extensive line of outdoors gear including guns, reloading gear, camping gear, canoes, fishing gear, etc. All touted as ``world`s best, award winning, secret old European family recipe, etc, etc.`` In reality most of it was pretty well made and well designed, and reasonably priced. It was almost exclusively a mail order business run out of Waseca, MN.

Most of their guns were imported from Europe, with Herter brand name and model designations. I suspect that the ``XK3`` was intended to evoke some vague connection with the beautiful and expensive Jaguar XKE sports cars popular at the time, to enhance their sex and sales appeal.

Diamond type inlays in contrasting color wood, or space age plastic were considered desirable adornments at the time, along with the extreme Monte Carlo roll over cheek pieces and deeply sculpted pistol grip. The diamonds on your gun may have been a factory option on a ``higher grade`` model, or a later addition by someone else. It was probably made circa 1960-1970. The 1968 Gun Control Act was a major handicap to a mail order firearms business and they seem to have gotten out of guns about 1970, and eventually vanished in the 1980s-90s. A couple of other companies with similar products and European sounding names popped up and eventually died as well, either successors to Herters, or copycats.

The XK3 is, according to Bolt Action Rifles by DeHaas, was either made in Germany or in Yugoslavia and will say so either way. It is a modified M98 Mauser, with the German XK3 being slightly different than the Yugo XK3. Other sources also claim they are made by Parker-Hale in England, or possibly even other places.

While dated in their extreme styling, they are well made guns and should perform well. Personally I think that a collection of all of Herters` different items would be a very interesting collecting niche, but few people seem to agree, so prices tend to be modest at best.

Hope that helps. Hope you come to the Utah Gun Collectors Assn show in Ogden in May or October.

John Spangler




16404  - Rast And Gasser Model 1898
1/9/2021
Ivan

Maker: Raster-Gasser, Model: ?, Caliber: 8mm, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: XX161

Markings:
Dear Sir, I've a 8shot 8mm Raster-Gasser revolver. It can be take in peace's w/o tools. On the right side of the frame is stamped '79R¨and ¨49¨. The serial number is xx161. It's condition is very good ( almost mint...except for the blue finish) Please, could you tell me some more about this gun?? Is it valuable, collectible?? I thank you in advance Ivan P. Souza

Answer:
Ivan, Leopold Gasser was a revolver manufacturer who operated two factories, producing up to 100,000 revolvers a year in the 1880s and 1890s. Gasser revolvers were adopted by the Austrian Army and were widely distributed throughout Austria-Hungary, and the Balkans. The most common Gasser revolver is the `Montenegrin Gasser'. Gasser patents were used in the `Rast and Gasser' Austrian service revolver of 1898. Leopold Gasser died in 1871, but the company continued operations for many years under the control of Leopold's son Johann. The Rast and Gasser Model 1898 Austrian Service revolver is an 8mm, with an eight-shot cylinder, it has a solid-frame and is gate loaded, with rod ejection. The loading gate, on the right side, disconnects the hammer from the trigger, and securely locks the hammer when the gate is opened for loading. The 'Rast and Gasser' looks clunky and angular but they were extremely well made pistols... Marc



16413  - Savage 30-30
1/9/2021
David Limestone NY

Maker: Savage, Model: ?, Caliber: 30 30, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Other - Blue, SN: 321964

Markings:
Savage lever action 30-30

Question:
I was wondering how do you determine the MD onthis weapon and its worth

Answer:
Sir- Thanks for contacting OldGuns.net. I regret we cannot help much on that one. We just do not know all that much about Savages. They have a reputation for being good guns, and there is a small, but enthusiastic, collector following for them.

There is a book on the Savage 99, which is probably what you have, which came out a year or two ago which probably has that information, but I never got sufficiently interested to buy a copy just for reference.

I think there is a Savage Arms Collectors group of some sort and they can probably help.

Sorry we cannot do more than that.

John Spangler




16409  - BREVET C F W-289
1/5/2021
AJ Anderson sc. USA

Maker: BREVET, Model: C F W-289, Caliber: Unknown, Barrel Length: Approx 24, Finish: Long Gun - Blue, SN: W-289

Markings:
Scrolling

Question:
I have a BREVET C F W-289. Double barrel different calibers. Possible 32 380 not sure. Cannot find any info on it

Answer:
Sir- I regret I cannot help on that one. Brevet is a term used on Belgian made guns pretty much the same as we would use ``patented`` on a product. Quite often these are actually unauthorized copies of foreign patented designs. There is no method to convert the numbers you mention to anything that I know of. Your best bet may be to try a Google image search to look for something similar. Hope that helps. John Spangler



16412  - Beretta 952
1/5/2021
David University Park Md US

Maker: Beretta, Model: 952, Caliber: 7.65 Para, Barrel Length: 4.5, Finish: Handgun - Blue, SN: D01048

Markings:
This pistol was imported by Garcia.

Question:
Gentlemen I am curious as to the total number of these pistols Beretta manufactured. The only reference regarding numbers that I can find for Modello 952 says The production of Model 952 began in 1963 serialized from 1001-2933. Fewer than 2000 were manufactured. The quote comes from an auction site. The site gives no source for the statement. Do you have better information As a side note a previous owner of the pistol cited here decided to decorate the lettering on the slide with something white fingernail polish. I was able to remove the white stuff with acetone with no damage to the bluing. This might be useful to others seeking to restore original lettering.

Answer:
David, I was not able to come up with much, none of my references had any information about production numbers for the Model 952 and it is not even listed in my blue book. I was able to find that the Model 952 was a variant of the earlier Model 951 chambered for the 7.65mm Parabellum cartridge. The model was said to have been intended for sales to sport shooters in Italy in order to comply with legal restrictions. There was also a Model 952 Special which was a target adaption of the Model 952 with a longer barrel, revised sights and anatomical grips. Marc



16410  - Need A Mag For 760 Gamemaster Carbine In 35 Rem.
1/2/2021
David York Maine. USA

Maker: Remington, Model: 760 Gamemaster Carbine, Caliber: 35rem, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Long Gun - Blue, SN: 233225

Markings:
D A on left side of barrel

Question:
I am looking for a magazine clip 35rem for my 760 Remington pump rifle. Thank you. David.

Answer:
David, the Model 760 Gamemaster Sporting Rifle was manufactured by the Remington Arms Company from 1952 to 1982. The rifle was a slide action design with detachable 4 round box magazine. The action was locked by rotating lugs on the bolt into the barrel extension as the slide ran forward. The Game master had skip-line pressed in checkering on both the pistol grip buttstock and on the forend. The Gamemaster was renamed `760A` in 1953, after the introduction of the ADL version. Cambering included 223 Remington, 6mm Remington, 243 Winchester, 257 Roberts, 270 Winchester, 280 Remington, 300 Savage, 30-06, 308 Winchester and 35 Remington.

I am afraid that I can not help with your quest for finding a magazine. You might want to try Gun Parts Corp or the want adds on Gun Broker. Good Luck, Marc




16411  - Frankenfield Carbine
1/2/2021
Gene Ogden UT

Maker: Springfield, Model: 1871, Caliber: .50-45-400, Barrel Length: 22, Finish: Long Gun - Blue, SN: 3031

Markings:
I have a rolling block carbine I inherited. The receiver is marked Springfield 1872 on the right side. On the left it is marked Model 1971. Trigger guard does not have a hole for a sling. It has a bar and saddle ring on the left side. Will not chamber a .50-70 case. Will chamber and fire a cut-down case to .50-45-400.

Question:
Is this a real as manufactured carbine. I have the Flaydermans guide. It mentions an experimental carbine. I have looked at a few other books too. But I havent found out anything. What do you think Where can I found out more information Thanks Gene

Answer:
Gene- Thanks for the photos, they help a lot. The action and butt are U.S. Army Model 1871 rolling block rifle made at Springfield. The saddle ring bar has been added.

The barrel and forend are from a Remington made U.S. Navy Model 1867 carbine. The Navy purchased 5,000 of these, and many were sold in near new condition, and then rebarreled by surplus dealers to calibers desired by new customers, including a large batch to South Carolina militia in .45-70, and various other clients and calibers.

Many of the surplus Navy barrel and forend assemblies were still on hand in the 1960s, being sold by Dixie Gun Works for modest prices. Most of those have since shown up married to the actions of various surplus rolling block actions.

Yours has the distinctive USN blue finish on the barrel with a serial number on the left flat. It also has an inspector cartouche on the right side of the forend, probably FCW for USN inspector Frank C. Warner, although I think there is another inspector on some. I cannot see it in the photo, but there is probably an anchor on the top of the barrel where it meets the receiver, right by the index marks. The rear sight is a standard U.S. M1868-1872 type, while the original USN sight had a much shorter leaf and slightly different base.

If you open the action on the carbine, the extractor on the USN M1867 was a stud on the front shelf of the rolling block, and as it opened, it would come back thru a narrow slot at the bottom of the chamber to extract the case. The M1872 used a rotary extractor on the left side of the breechblock, which grabs the fired case at the 9:00 o`clock position.

The 1,013 Springfield rifles and 313 carbines made in 1870 for the Army trials were marked 1870, NOT Model 1871 or dated 1872. The carbines had the sling swivel on the trigger guard, and the saddle ring bar was very similar to the Sharps pattern, with the forward end screwing into a hole on the left side of the receiver above the rear guard retention screw, and the rear end of the 2.85`` bar attached to the stock by a wood screw. All the M1870 trial arms used the same sliding bar extractor as the USN M1870 rifles, which had an additional screw on the left side of the receiver located about in the middle of where the barrel extension is located.

I used to have one of these Frankenfield carbines with a Navy front end, but the action was a Remington commercial export one, not Springfield made. I am confident that your is not something made at Springfield Armory, but rather a parts assembly to satisfy someone`s personal desires, probably in the mid-20th century. It would probably be a fun shooter.