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15821  - BROWNING .303 MACHINE GUN FOR SPITFIRE RESTORATION
7/14/2018
Gary

Maker: Browning, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
I'm hoping you can help me a bit here in finding a weapon for me. Actually it's not for me, but for a fellow volunteer at the aircraft restoration museum I volunteer at. My friend is building a WWII Spitfire, and from the ground up no less. His "real" job is he restores Stearmen biplanes. But I digress. He's getting close to finishing it now and would really like to find a Browning 303 like the plane used to carry. Any idea at all where he could find one? Do you happen have one laying around anywhere? I'll be standing by. Thanks my friend.

Answer:
Gary- Good to hear from you again. Finding a .303 Browning for a Spitfire will be difficult to impossible. However, the .30-06 versions were basically identical except for the bore and chamber in the barrel, and the front of the bolt where the rimmed .303 case required a wider opening than the .30-06. Externally they appear visually identical. Live guns with BATF approved paperwork, etc are out there in .30-06, and perhaps a few in .303, but probably would run $10-20K, and have all the hassles associated with "machine gun" as well as security and safety concerns.

My understanding is that the M2 used in aircraft was similar to the ground mounted M1919 air cooled except the aircraft guns had lighter barrels (if you look closely inside the barrel jacket with all the holes) and wing guns did not have any grips like the ground guns.

Several people make replica non-firearm copies of the .30 Brownings and some do both the aircraft M2 and ground M1919 variations. Here are links to a couple I have found. Not cheap, but good looking, and no safety or security hassles.

http://www.gunsofliberty.com/gol_anm2_fixed.htm priced at $795 for M2 fixed mount

https://shop.ironcreationsllc.com/product.sc?productId=516&categoryId=112

Hope that helps. John Spangler




15850  - 7.65 Liliput Pistol
7/14/2018
Tim, Tahuya, Wa, USA

Maker: MENZ ?, Model: Liliput Mod. II ?, Caliber: 7.65, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: NA

Markings:
''Made in Belgium'', Zw 129, crown over N, gold wreath around 7.65 on grip, TROLIT on back of wreath.

Question:
Good morning, Looking for some info on this gun. I have done some research and this is what I have come up with so far. It appears to be a Menz Liliput mod. II. There are no serial numbers, manufacturer name, or model numbers. It does have the following marks: ''Made in Belgium'' on the slide, Crown over N mark on the slide and frame, ''Zw 129'' stamped on the front of the frame under the trigger guard, ''s'' to the rear of the safety. The grips have the 7.65 surrounded by a gold laurel wreath. The backside of the grip is marked ''TROLIT''. It also came with a leather holster that has a mark under the flap ''WA2'' The center lines of the W are over lapped. This is the only pic I have right now, but I can get more if needed. Thanks, Tim

Answer:
Tim, Waffenfabrik August Menz of Suhl started out manufacturing the 7.65 mm Beholla pistol for the German army circa 1916 - 1918. Production continued after the war under the trade - name 'Menta'. A scaled-down 6.35 mm version dates from the immediate post - 1920 era. From these beginnings, Menz went on to produce guns of his own design until the late 1930s.

Menz first marketed the Liliput model in 1920, the first version was a tiny blowback automatic chambered in 4.25mm. The 4.25mm cartridge had originated with the Erika (q.v.), made by Pfannl prior to 1914, Menz adopted it to keep his pistol as small as possible. Although it made use of an unconventional cartridge, the Liliput appears to have had a lengthy production life with specimens stamped `MODELL 1927` commonly encountered.

In 1925 Menz started offering the Liliput in 6.35 mm and 7.65 mm chamberings. Few 7.65 mm versions of the Liliput were produced as Menz chose to market a similar - but - separate model as the Menz Model II which was an enlarged Liliput. Bijou, Kaba, Kaba Spezial and Okzet are some of the trade names that the Liliput pistol was sold under through various dealers. Hope that this helps, Marc.




15842  - Winchester Mod 70 Carbine Value
7/10/2018
Dale

Maker: Winchester, Model: Model 70, Caliber: 30.06, Barrel Length: Carbine Short Barrel, 22''??, Finish: Blue, SN: 28111

Question:
How much is this rifle worth. I would never sell it, it was handed down to me from my dear grandfather

Answer:
Dale, Winchester Model 70 Carbines were manufactured from 1936 to 1946, they were discontinued shortly after WWII. The manufacture date for your rifle is 1939 so it does fall in the correct serial number range for Winchester Carbines. Carbines manufactured during this period came with a 20 inch barrel and if original, the front sight base is an integral part of the barrel. The value of your carbine will depend on condition and whether any modifications have been made to it. The addition of a recoil pad or the stock being notched for a custom sight, for example, can cut value by half or more. The Blue Book of Gun Values indicates ``add 50%-75% for carbine variations .22 Hornet (watch for fakes with cut off barrels, re chambered "K" models, and examine the front sight carefully), .250-3000 Savage, .257 Roberts, .270 Win., 7mm, or .30-06 (most common)``. Hope this helps. Marc



15820  - EARLY M1873 TRAPDOOR SPRINGFIELD CADET RIFLE?
7/10/2018
Don

Maker: Springfield, Model: Trapdoor, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
After looking at Trapdoor production data it looks like if correct there was only one made in 1874. Is this true and would it be extremely rare one of a kind. It is in very good condition. Barrel is 29 and 5/8" or some say it is 29 and 1/2" with serial number 3404X. My question is this true and what kind of value would it have?

Answer:
Don- The one M1873 cadet rifle made in 1874 is probably serial number 3638 which is the Springfield Armory museum. Serial numbers 31172, 33129 and 33200 are all noted as cadet rifles, but most of the numbers nearby are for carbines, not infantry or cadet rifles. Most of the guns under serial number 50,000 were recalled and scrapped and many of the parts were sold off as scrap, but much of this scrap was later assembled into guns in various configurations.

There are a number of small details in parts which changed over time and would reveal if your gun has all parts for the same date and the right markings to be considered "original." If so, it would be worth a lot more than a mix of various vintage parts assembled later.

There were not many cadet rifles made, but very few collectors have any interest in them so they tend to bring surprisingly low prices, and of course condition is a very big variable.

You might as other folks over at http://trapdoorcollector.com for their thoughts. Hope that helps. John Spangler




15819  - DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DATES OF BARRELS AND RECEIVERS
7/7/2018
Shane

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
I was wondering if you could help me out with a question I have? What how many months apart should an M1 Garand Barrel date and receiver date be apart to be correct? Should the barrel date come after the receiver or before? I have visited your site often and know how knowledgeable you can be. Thanks

Answer:
Shane- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters.

There is no guaranteed correct answer on this question. Anyone who tells you guns manufacturing (on military guns at least) is "always" or "never" done a certain way is probably wrong. Policies and procedures do not survive unscathed in the real world of an industrial operation, especially in wartime.

There are some trends and patterns, but just about anything is possible in a mass production scenario where different parts are made at different locations within one maker's facility, or when parts are subcontracted. Sometimes a surplus builds up and production is cut back for a while, or several days/months production may be diverted to supply as spares rather than being sent to the assembly lines, resulting in "early dates" appearing longer. Other times equipment or personnel problems or higher priority work results in shortages of parts so assembly may be delayed, or scrounging around in storage bins may turn up needed parts lost in dark corners or buried in storage bins.

Typically, most M1 Garands made at Springfield will have the barrel date 1-3 months earlier than the calculated receiver date. Same month and year would be fine, 1,2 or 3 months earlier no cause for alarm. If a month or two later than expected, then maybe a receiver got delayed for some reason before it was used. Outside of these parameters the chances of it being an original barrel and receiver combination grow ever smaller.

In military arms the mismatch of barrels and receivers comes from the fact that ordnance facilities rebuilt huge numbers of rifles, usually leaving the barrels in place if barrel and receiver were in serviceable condition. If not, the barrels were pulled and rifles went on to be assembled with whatever salvaged barrels were on hand, or with new barrels pulled from spare parts inventory. Springfield (and other makers) filled large orders for quantities of parts for stockpiling in the supply system as spares in addition to those being used for current rifle production.

Once you enter the world of "restored guns" then the barrel and receiver may or may not be an original combination, or the result of whatever Bubba was able to scrounge up before the assembly fun began.

One important exception is for the M1D sniper rifles which were ALL made by reworking existing rifles with new barrels, and this work was spread out among many facilities over a very long time, mostly in small quantities. All M1D barrels should have dates in 1952 with a few from late 1951 or early 1953, and ALL have the drawing number ending in 555. If you find a purported M1D with a barrel drawing number ending in 448 it is a standard barrel that someone modified by adding the scope mount block, probably from one of the parts dealers. Real M1D rifles were assembled on receivers made by any of the four makers, although most are Springfield or Winchester. John Spangler




15841  -
7/7/2018
Canada

Maker: Remington, Model: Model 12, Caliber: .22, Barrel Length: 24, Finish: Don`t Know, SN: NA

Markings:
pump action .22

Question:
It is not in working condition but all the parts are there, I want to know how much is the selling about, and where I could go to sell it.

Answer:
The Remington Model 12 which was later designated the 12A, was manufactured from 1909 to 1936. The model was a popular and production reached around 840,000. The 12A was a hammerless slide action .22 rifle that came with a 22 inch barrel, open sights, tubular magazine and a plain grip walnut stock. Remington also offered the Model 12B which was a gallery model with an octagon barrel chambered in .22 short, the 12C which had a 24 inch octagon barrel and came in grades D,E and F, the 12C NRA target, and the 12CS which was chambered in .22 Remington Special.

I often see Remington Model 12 rifles that are in almost new condition selling at gunshows in the $700 - $750 range. I would expect to see a rusty or non-functioning example being offered for sale at a gunshow in the $200 range. Marc




15840  - Herter`s XK3 Refle
7/3/2018
Palmer, Alaska

Maker: Herter`s, Model: XK3, Caliber: .308, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Don`t Know, SN: 1343

Markings:
It says Yugoslavia - I didn`t see the serial number on the rifle, but I did see 1343 stamped on the inside of the bolt handle. The barrel doesn`t appear to be the normal bluing that I`m used to - the bolt looks like its chrome??

Question:
I would just like to know what something like this is worth? Are they good, accurate rifles - anything special about them? Thank you for your help - it was my dad`s rifle, and was left to me (he passed away when I was 7). I always thought it was cheap, as the barrel was not the normal bluing, and the bold a chrome type material. Thank you, Matthew

Answer:
Rodney- Herters was a very interesting firm, active from about 1960 to 1979. They proclaimed themselves to be an old established maker of the world's best guns, ammo, duck calls, canoes, reloading gear, etc, etc, etc. Most of it was actually pretty good stuff, and very reasonably priced. However their guns never really caught on, and were apparently foreign made variations of established designs.

Herters rifles seem to have been made in England or Yugoslavia, and are reportedly good, reliable guns. Presently, there is not allot of collecting interest in Herters firearms, value for your rifle is about what a comparable J.C. Higgins or Revelation rifle would sell for. I do not know the exact time period for the XK3 rifle, but since they worked for a relatively short period of time, it has to be in that narrow window. Marc




15818  - HOW DO YOU SHRINK WRAP BOXES OF COLLECTOR AMMUNITION?
7/3/2018
William

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
I received the ammo and all looks good. Thank you for sealing the boxes. If you don't mind me asking, what did you use to seal them?

Answer:
William- Shrink wrap is done with rolls of the plastic type material in a sort of tube shape made specially for shrink wrapping, mostly for the retail trade.

You also need a "impulse sealer" sort of like a paper cutter with electrodes instead of a cutting blade which is used to seal the seams. Then you use a heat gun (hair dryer or paint stripper type) which you blow on the item and the heat causes the plastic to shrink. After about 5 boxes the heat gun gets too hot and will burn holes in plastic so you have to redo that one and wait a while. Plastic comes in roll of 1,000 feet or so, (I have been using same roll for at least 10 years). Sealer is about $95 item and requires replacement of the heat strips periodically at about $15 per set. Not really practical for someone wanting to do a box or two.

You can also buy clear cellophane wrapping at office supply places on a roll like Christmas paper for about $5-10 per roll, and wrap boxes like a gift package and seal with tape and that turns out pretty good without the expense of all the specialized stuff. Hope that helps. John