Questions And Answers Page

If you have a question about firearms and you want it posted on this page click here.

Return to Collectors Headquarters.

Click here to go to the question and answer monthly index.

Click here to go to the question and answer subject index.


15697  - Savage 1893?
10/21/2017
Pat Shelburne NS Canada

Maker: Savage, Model: 1893 - 899, Caliber: 303, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: 206404 ?

Markings:
lever action , shell counter

Question:
Not sure of the year , and would like to be able to get parts for the rifle if possible .Would like as much info as possible .Can you help ?

Answer:
Pat, none of my reference books list a Savage Model 1893 - 899. The Blue book does list a Model 1895 that was chambered in .303 Savage only. This was a lever action model that came in carbine configuration with a 22 inch barrel, a rifle configuration with a 26 inch barrel or musket with a 30 inch barrel. The 1895 had a 6 shot rotary magazine and some had the Savage unfired shots indicator. The blue book indicates that these rifles were originally manufactured by Marlin, and marked "Savage Repeating Arms Co. Utica, N.Y. U.S.A. Pat. Feb. 7, 1893,". For parts, you need to determine what model that you have, then check with Gun Parts Corp (the old Numrich Arms people). Good luck, Marc



15643  - REMINGTON PERCUSSION SERIAL NUMBER LOCATIONS
10/21/2017
Beth Appleton, WI

Maker: E. Remington And Sons, Model: Pocket Revolver, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Question:
I just inherited this gun and I don`t know where to find the serial number

Answer:
Beth- Most old guns that had serial number had them marked in pretty visible locations on the base of the grip or the frame or barrel somewhere. However, serial numbers were not required until 1968 so many makers did not use them, and sometimes used batch or assembly numbers just to keep parts matched up during final finishing, but totally unrelated to what we would consider serial numbers. Remington usually marked their antique revolver serial numbers on the left side of the grip frame, but you have to remove the grips to see the number. Sometimes they also marked the serial number on the bottom of the barrel, but if refinished, these can be hard to read. Hope that helps. John Spangler



15699  - Mod 94 Type
10/17/2017
Mark, Salisbury, MO

Maker: Winchester, Model: 94, Caliber: 30-30, Barrel Length: 20 Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: 2819373

Question:
I know it was made in 1965 but don`t know if it is a ranger or trapper etc. Can you help?

Answer:
Mark, there is not much that I can tell you from the serial number. Suggest that you take your 94 to the next gunshow in your area and show it to a couple of dealers who have similar items for sale. They will probably be able to help. Good luck, Marc



15661  - Shotgun In A Suitcase " Mexican American Railway Company "
10/17/2017
Ed

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
Here are some photos of an old shotgun in a suitcase type rig with a “reloading pack.” cleaning rod, some reloading tools, brass cases, badge and boarding pass type items. What do you think?

Answer:
Ed- Thanks for the photos, they help a lot.

In my opinion any association between this gun and the Texas Mexico Railway Company is extremely questionable, if not downright fraudulent.

The gun itself is an unremarkable and without any documented history would probably sell in the $75-125 retail range like other early double barrel shotguns circa 1890-1920 from obscure makers.

I have seen a lot of similar "fantasy guns" with various markings and "related" items. Theses include items purported to be associated with Wells Fargo and other stage coach lines, sheriffs, Indian Police, Railroads, bordellos, etc. Often the guns have some sort of official looking badge attached to the stock and various stampings supposedly relating to whatever the claim to fame is. Various other trinkets are sometimes included, some likely original authentic artifacts, and others fantasy creations themselves.

This sort of fakery, or fantasy creation has been popular for at least 50 years or so, especially in "old west" tourist areas where gullible people are likely to want a souvenir item. I know of some "Indian Police" guns sold at auction for $200-300 which is probably reasonable for a decorative souvenir item, but one sold for over $2,000 and I have heard that another eventually changed hands at $5,000. Proving that P.T. Barnum was right when he said "There is a sucker born every minute." Many of the people selling these are themselves victims of deception, but at some point there is someone (or several people) who have been making a lot of faked guns for the purposes of deception.

I would not purchase this gun, nor accept it if given to me. We would not be willing to sell it on our site except as "old shotgun with alleged connection with Texas Mexico Railroad which is almost certainly totally false."

To my eye, the casing is not one originally made for guns, but adapted from some other use, likely within the last 50 years, but possibly any time from a year ago to the early 1900s. The "Texas Mexican Railway Police Shotgun Reloading Pack" is almost certainly a totally bogus creation, although the shotgun reloading tools are likely authentic (but very common, cheap items).

If you do not own this gun, stay far away from it. I would be very reluctant to buy anything from someone selling this sort of item. Hope that helps. John Spangler




15660  - U. S. Navy 3 Inch Guns, Ammunition, Fuzes
10/14/2017
Brian

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
I have a WW2 U.S. Navy 3 inch dummy training cartridge that needs a fuze. I wonder if you could share what you know about this round & the gun. Have had some trouble finding much at all about it. Anything would be appreciated, Thanks.

Answer:
Brian- The 3"/50 caliber gun was adopted by the U.S. Navy prior to WW1, and the name indicates it has 3" diameter bore with the barrel length 50 times the core diameter, hence the 3"/50 name which distinguishes it from other 3" guns in use.

The term "gun" technically applies to the barrel, which was (with occasional slight external modifications) attached to different "mounts" but all using the same 3"/50 caliber ammunition.

The 3"/50 mounts included low elevation types during WW1, and by WW2 they had mounts which could reach very high elevation to serve as anti-aircraft (AA) weapons. All of those were manually loaded, one round at a time, and were called "slow fire" guns. The speed with which a crew could load and fire was very important. For AA use, it was important to get the cartridge loaded as quickly as possible from the "fuze setter" into the barrel and fired so that it would go off at exactly the right time to burst near an aircraft and get a hit. The mechanical time fuse usually used for AA fire (prior to late 1944) would be set by inserting the tip of the cartridge about 3 inches into a device that had an internal moving head which would turn the small lug on the moveable part of the fuze the proper amount relative to the other lug on the rear or fixed part of the fuze. (Same concept as twisting the dial on a kitchen timer so it will go off at the desired time.)

To allow crews to become proficient "loading machines" were provided on all but the smallest ships to allow crews to practice the choreography of loading and firing. These consisted of a rough approximation of the breech mechanism of the gun which could be adjusted for different angles of elevation. A fuze setter device would be nearby. The gun crew would take turns rotating through the different jobs so all could do them in case of casualties. One man would take a cartridge and pass it to the loader who would insert the nose into the fuze setter. When the gun captain ordered the gun to be loaded, the loader would pull it from the fuze setter, insert the cartridge into the breech which would close, simulating firing. The hot shellman would then grab the cartridge as it was ejected from the breech and get it out of the way, while a new cartridge was passed to the loader to put into the fuze setter. A good crew could fire 15-20 rounds per minute.

Your type of drill cartridge was used with the fuze setters on loading machines. A different type with a steel projectile but wooden case body and no fuze could also be used to develop the basic rhythm of the loading drill and these were cheaper and more durable.

The same 3"/50 combat ammunition could also be used with later "rapid fire" guns which used a mechanical loading system taking cartridges from a rotary sprocket or drum type magazine above the barrel. These were introduced late in WW2 about the time that the variable time proximity fuzes replaced the mechanical time fuzes. That eliminated the fuze setter from the loading process, but required two men loading ammo into the sprockets due to a much higher rate of fire (22-25 rounds per minute for each of the two guns on a twin mount). The drill cartridges used with these were all metal as the old wood designs would be chewed up by the magazine sprockets.

That is probably more than you ever wanted to know about 3"/50 dummies. Hope it helps. John Spangler




15688  - Webley R.I..C
10/14/2017
United States

Maker: Webley R.I..C, Model: No 1 450 CF, Caliber: Unknown, Barrel Length: 3 1/4'', Finish: Nickel, SN: 17858

Markings:
This gun also has the names Ashford and W.R. Leeson stamped on the topside right above the cylinder.

Question:
Can you tell me what year this gun was manufactured. And if it is worth anything

Answer:
The Webley R.I.C. or Bulldog was a blued 5 shot, solid frame, revolver with fixed sights and a distinctive curved butt. These revolvers were available in 2&1/8 - 4&1/2 in. barrel lengths. The R.I.C. model was manufactured from 1867-1939 for Royal Irish Constabulary (R.I.C.) and was available in .320 - .476 calibers, of which, .455 Webley was the most common. The Bulldog was one of Webley's more successful designs, and it was copied and made in several different countries, both in rimfire and centerfire, some manufacturers even made special ammunition for it.

The blue book indicates that serial numbers exceeded 60,300 by October of 1884 so your revolver was manufactured prior to 1884. For more information on serial numbers check with Arms Research, As for value of the revolver, the blue book it does not list a nickel finish for this model. If your revolver does not have it's original finish, value will be modest. If you can tie the names that are stamped on the revolver to persons or events of historical significance, the value will be higher. Marc




15684  - Baby Hammerless Parts
10/10/2017
ralph overley,reading,pa.19610

Maker: Baby Hammerless, Model: 1924, Caliber: 22, Barrel Length: 1 - /4, Finish: Nickel, SN: NONE ON

Markings:
grip blk /s at top - trigger folds up

Question:
Where can I find parts to repair firing mech?

Answer:
ralph, I recommend you check with Gun Parts Corp (the old Numrich Arms people) at the following URL:

http://www.gunpartscorp.com/

Gun Parts Corp has just about everything. If that doesn't work, try posting it on our free "Wanted" page at the following URL:

http://oldguns.net/submitwn.htm

Good luck, Marc




15659  - A & S Crockett Long Rifle
10/10/2017


Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
I'm in search for a gun from the war of 1812. My Great Great grandfather made them for Andrew Jackson's soldiers. He and his son made them in Franklin Tennessee. Samuel and Andrew Crockett were their names. I believe there would be an inscription A & S Crockett on the guns. Any ideas how I might could search for these? Blessings!

Answer:
Sir- The only reference I could find to a possible match is a listing in Frank Sellers' "American Gunsmiths" which listed Samuel Crockett as working in Tennessee but no information other than that.

It was quite common for gun makers in the early 19th century to not mark their products and often the only markings on a gun will be those of the person who made the lock. Locks were often sold to gun makers by specialists who only made locks, some in the U.S. and some imported from England. Thus, the Crockett rifles may not be identifiable in any way from countless others.

There are collectors who specialize in "American long rifles" sometimes called Kentucky or Pennsylvania rifles, or further broken down by the region where they were made. If you find someone who collects those, and has a special interest in guns made in Tennessee, they might know a whole lot more. I had a collector friend who liked Tennessee rifles, but he passed away a few years ago, and I do not know who to recommend.

Good luck! John Spangler




15679  - Grips For My 45
10/7/2017
Kent, Titusville, Florida

Maker: Colt, Model: Military Issue, Caliber: 45, Barrel Length: 5'', Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Question:
The gun was patented 1917 does not have original grips, is it worth pursuing? Can I get grips for it?

Answer:
Kent, you should be able to find some original grips at a gunshow if you keep an eye out for them. If you would have sent me the serial number, I could have told you what type of grips to look for. Marc



15658  - Savage Percussion Revolver Parts
10/7/2017


Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
Looking for original or reproduction grips for A Savage Navy Model Percussion Revolver noted above. Any ideas on where

Parts for this revolver might be found would be greatly appreciated. Serial number is 2974. Thank you

Answer:
Sir- There is an outfit called East Taylor which has some Savage parts. They also offer some wood parts for other guns, and you might contact them to see if they can make some for you. I have purchased some items from them and have been very pleased with quality, service and price. Worth a try.

http://www.partsforantiqueguns.com/savagereparts.html

Or, try S&S Firearms or Lodgewood Manufacturing- Google them.

John Spangler




15694  - Page-Lewis Arms Information Source
10/3/2017
Charles, Portland, OR

Maker: Page-Lewis Arms, Model: C Olympia, Caliber: 22 Lr, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: NONE

Question:
Where can I find information on a Page-Lewis Arms Model C Olympia 22 lr rifle? No serial number available. Thank you

Answer:
Charles, Page-Lewis Arms Company started business in 1921 with about 150 workers. The Page-Lewis factory was located in manufacturing facilities that were previously used by the automobile company, Stevens Duryea. The first shipment of Page-Lewis rifles left the factory in July of 1921.

Page-Lewis introduced the Model A Target Rifle, the Model B Sharpshooter, and the Model C Olympic Rifle in 1921. All three rifles shared the same type of under lever, falling block action which was fabricated from steel plate, and housed the lockwork inside the breechblock. A single coil spring was used to drive both the hammer and the trigger and the butt was attached by a large longitudinal bolt. Rifles could be dissembled by use of a take-down bolt which lay beneath the frame ahead of the trigger guard.

A good resource for more information is American Boys Rifles 1890-1945 Paperback – 1984 by Jim Perkins, you can order the book from Amazon at the following link: https://www.amazon.com/American-Boys-Rifles-1890-1945-Perkins/dp/0891451307. Good luck, Marc




15657  - Identify A Rifle " M78 "
10/3/2017


Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
I have an old military looking long rifle with strap. I can make out the numbers and M78 but no make or model.

Answer:
Sir- Almost certainly a Swiss Model 1878 Vetterli rifle like this one. http://www.oldguns.net/cat_fa_antique_long.htm#GRA21532

We have a couple of these on hand and do not really need another right now. They are "antiques" not subject to the paperwork hassles associated with modern guns, and a local antique shop may be interested.

Tens of thousands of these were brought into the U.S. in the 1960s, many in nearly new condition, and not a lot of people collect Swiss rifles and you cannot get ammo, so they are slow to sell. John Spangler