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15759  - Ruger? Buffalo Scout
2/17/2018
David Everett Wa.

Maker: Ruger, Model: E15MB, Caliber: 22L, Barrel Length: 4 3/4, Finish: Blue, SN: E829328

Markings:
Buffalo Scout with Pearl grips

Question:
When was this pistol made?

Answer:
David, I can not say for sure without seeing your revolver but it does not sound to me like it is a Ruger. My guess is that is one of the FIE imports. I have never paid allot of attention to FIE but if I remember correctly, the Buffalo Scout (E15 Series) was imported by FIE in the 1980s. The blue book indicates that the revolvers were manufactured in Brescia, Italy and that they came standard in .22 LR caliber with a 4.75 inch barrel and blue finish. Chrome finish was also available as was .22 magnum chambering. Sorry to have to tell you bad news but values for Buffalo Scout revolvers is not high. The range in the blue book is $30 to $150 depending on condition. Marc



15732  - ENGLISH PERCUSSION BOOT (POCKET) PISTOL
2/17/2018
John Orr

Maker: Taylor London, Model: Percussion, Caliber: Unknown, Barrel Length: 4'', Finish: Other, SN: NONE

Markings:
engraved and has London on one side and Taylor on the other. A boot pistol

Question:
When was the year made, and possible worth. This is in fine condition and functions as it should with strong trigger spring. It also has a folding trigger that comes into view when the hammer is in the full cock position.

Answer:
John- Since this is percussion, it probably dates to sometime after 1825, more likely 1830-1850 vintage. “Boot” pistols generally were very cheaply made and had a conventional fixed trigger and trigger guard. Pistols with folding triggers were generally considered to be “pocket” pistols as they were more compact and concealable, and cost a bit more as they were more complicated. There were a number of Taylor gunmakers in London, so it is hard to pin down an exact date. These are generally nice little guns, but there are a lot of them, and not a lot of collector interest other than the “cute” factor so I often see guns like you describe selling for around $150 or so, maybe a bit higher or lower depending on condition and any special features. Hope that helps. John Spangler



15758  - Winchester 670
2/14/2018
Monte Parrott VA

Maker: Winchester, Model: 670A, Caliber: 30-06, Barrel Length: 21, Finish: Blue, SN: G195441

Markings:
none

Question:
I having a hard time finding anything about it....its really nice shape

Answer:
Anthony, the Winchester Model 670 is an economy version of the popular model 70 that came with a hardwood pistol grip stock, 22 inch barrel, open sights and a non-hinged floorplate. Although it is a decent rifle for shooting and hunting purposes, the Model 670 never caught on with collectors like the Pre-64 Model 70 Winchesters did. The 670 was first cataloged for sale in 1967 and remained in production until 1973. Total manufacture is estimated to be under 300,000 total rifles. Information pertaining to the production runs for the 670 is at best speculative, as Winchester either did not maintain a serial number data base, or what data was retained has been lost or destroyed. Because of this, there is no way to know precisely when your rifle was produced. Marc



15727  - SHARPS FOUR BARREL DERRINGER PARTS
2/14/2018
Danny, Grand Bay, AL USA

Maker: U. Sharps, Model: Pepperbox 4 Barrel Pat. 1859, Caliber: .25, Barrel Length: 3'', Finish: Blue, SN: 15234

Markings:
None - been in our family for over 100 years

Question:
I need to buy a hammer for this gun. My uncle broke it years ago and I would like to get it repaired. The problem is that sharps didn`t make a .25 caliber for normal sales (they made .22, .30 and .32). They told me it would have been a special order gun. The hammer for my .25 is much smaller than the one for the .22 caliber. Do you know where I can find a hammer for this gun?

Answer:
Danny- Sorry, we cannot help with that. Dixie Gun Works used to have a few parts for the Sharps derringers many years ago, but I have not seen a source since then. John Spangler



15756  - Heym 22
2/10/2018
Germany

Maker: F.W. Heym, Model: Detective, Caliber: .22 L.R., Barrel Length: 4 Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: 04566

Question:
What would be the value of this handgun i have inherited and what year model is it.

Answer:
F.W. Heym of Munnerstadt was established in 1932 in Suhl, they were makers of high quality shotguns and sporting rifles. Heym moved to West Germany after the end of the Second World War. In the 1960s Heym introduced a line of short barrelled .22LR revolvers. The revolvers were a solid-frame double-action pattern of pretty good quality; it was sold in the USA by Hunter of Hollywood as the Detective Model. Unfortunately, there is not much demand for the little Heym revolvers. Information that I was able to find on them sets values in the $200 or less range. Marc



15726  - 1908 MAUSER RIFLE
2/10/2018
Anne

Maker: Mauser, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: Rifle, Finish: Other, SN: ?

Markings:
System WaffenFabrik, Mauser A-G Oberndorf A/N 1908 2,4g G.B.P. St.M.G 14330 Markings on the Barrel

Question:
I`m looking for information on this Mauser, more history, value? it`s in great, original condition.

Answer:
Sorry, we cannot help much with this one. It sounds like one of the many military Mauser270 rifles which were converted to a sporting rifle in Germany. The proof marks definitely sound like commercial rather than military marks. Anything beyond that would be even more speculative than this. John Spangler



15730  - 1853 ENFIELD STYLE WITH “M” MARKINGS BY J.P. MOORE
2/6/2018
William, Olathe, KS, USA

Maker: Moore?, Model: 1953 Enfield Pattern, Caliber: 57.7, Barrel Length: 55, Finish: Other, SN: NA

Markings:
M-CS 1863

Question:
I have renewed my interest in old CW firearms following my attending the big gun show in Tulsa last weekend. For years, all of my long arms have been stored away due to lack of space in my new house. I finally finished my basement and have one room set aside for my little ''military'' museum. One of my guns is an 1863 dated ''M'' rifle, which is a rather roughly crafted copy of an 1853 Model Enfield, three of which I also have. These ''M''s have been sometimes referred to as the ''Mystery'' rifle because of a theory that they were Confederate made. This theory was promoted by two men who authored a book on Confederate firearms, Richard Hill and his late and former father-in-law William Anthony. Norman Flayderman strongly ridiculed their work in his books with his documentation that the ''M'' rifles were made by J.P. Moore, an arms jobber in New York. I had the privilege of visiting with Mr. Anthony, who resided in Gastonia, North Carolina, prior to his passing a few years ago, and had him examine my rifle. After looking it over he exclaimed the gun confirmed what he and his son-in-law had written, that this gun just looks too ''Confederate'' to be from the North. He pointed out that the stock was cut of wood not sufficiently cured when assembled and thus shows much ''shrinkage'' in the butt area unlike any other Enfield or arm made in the North. The brass nose cap has rough edges and holes from the casting, again unlike any British Enfield he had seen and ''indeed'' unlike any of my other three Enfields, something that would never have passed muster in the North but was often passed by southern gun makers as they were just interested in getting a working gun to the field as quick as possible. The three bands each have crude X`s, one through three from the muzzle to the breech stamped in the bands and corresponding Xs on the stock. Mr. Anthony believed these to be for purpose of instructing slave labor in the final assembly. Since acquiring my ''M'' some twenty plus years ago, I have seen perhaps a dozen or so ''M''s at various gun and CW shows around the country and have come to believe that both Flayderman and Hill and Anthony are correct. I believe that J.P. Moore was the original gun maker of the ''M'' rifles but it is unlikely that he continued to supply the Union army or northern state militias with these arms for three years. This is largely because most of the surviving ''M''s were found in the south and the quality of these arms varies greatly from the 1861 stamped models to the 1863s. It is also a mystery that even Flayderman can`t explain as to why the locks starting in 1863 appeared with the strange scripted CS stamped over the shield and just above the M. Would any northern gun maker, either an approved federal ordinance supplier or not, have gone to the trouble to use such a stamp? I believe that at some point Moore, for whatever reason, stopped making these arms and many of his parts, at least many unused M stamped locks, somehow were shipped to the south and were used to make Enfield rifles by southern gun makers. It has been suggested that the Walter Watson - Fayetteville, NC stamps found on some of the ''M''s were put there out of some sort of chicanery to promote the value of these. I find that to be quite a stretch as the ''M''s have never demanded a real high price as were the other Confederate arms and according to Anthony, no gun ''dealer'' himself, had observed the Watson stamp on four different ''M''s at various times and from various owners, two of which had the guns handed down through the family. I have a two band undated Barnett Enfield, a three band 1863 dated Tower Enfield, and an 1862 dated Enfield that has been converted to the Snyder breech action. The ''M'', even though looks similar to the British guns when displayed together, looks like the ugly step child in comparison. Other than the ''green'' stock, the lock shield emblem on my ''M'' is stamped crooked on the lock compared to my other Enfields, all of which have the British crown emblem stamped straight up and down. The stock is longer in the butt than the British versions. The barrel does have the British proof marks identical to the Tower Enfield and my ''M'' even still has the original old leather sling on it. I acknowledge that any claims of the ''M'' rifle being a southern made arm is conjecture but if the evidence that all ''M''s are Moore rifles is based on a single letter, I wouldn`t think that any collector, enthusiast, or historian could ignore the strong evidence to the contrary. I hope to hear any good feedback on the subject of the ''M'' Enfields would be most appreciated. Best regards, The Colonel

Answer:
William- I notice you asked the nearly identical question on a Civil War site in 2014, without any replies, and on another site earlier in December 2017, so I will do what I can for you. First, any attempt to compare these with their British made cousins, either the hand-made non-interchangeable guns by various makers or the Enfield interchangeable guns (made on machinery purchased in the U.S., and set up to James Burton, former master armorer at Harpers Ferry) is comparing apples and oranges, especially regarding markings.

Second- While the book by Hill and Anthony was okay for its time in 1978 it was mainly a photographic record of arms attributed to the Confederacy. The amount of archival research by other historians since then has far surpassed any assumptions or claims which may have been accepted in 1978. In fact, pages 99-100 of Robert M. Reilly’s superb “U.S. Military Small Arms 1816-1865” published in 1970 pretty well documented that these were American made by James P. Moore of New York, and some were sold to the U.S. government or states.

George Moller’s unsurpassed research covers the federal purchased Moore rifles in detail on pages 409-419 of Volume 3 of “American Military Shoulder Arms” published in 2011. He speculates that those dated 1863 were sold to state or private purchasers after rejection by federal inspectors. He also notes that Moore obtained from Whitney many Enfield parts, mostly apparently left over from the Robins & Lawrence contracts making Enfields for Britain in 1856, and also Enfield style barrels made in Liege for Colt 1861 Special muskets but rejected. Moller does specifically mention a variety of marks found on bands on the Union accepted muskets, so their being related to slaves assembling arms seems improbable. He also notes that there is wide variation in the eagle/shield/M markings, which seem to be more cut than stamped. In my opinion any “CS” seen requires a good imagination and is probably just sloppy work on the eagle talons, arrows and olive branches above the shield.

Documentation on state purchases is more elusive, but several have been observed with Louisiana State Militia markings (LSM) on the trigger guard tang. Some or all dated 1863. These were likely some of the arms procured to arm the three regiments of new “Union” forces (mostly black troops) raised in Louisiana after the capture and occupation in 1862 by General Butler, and not, as some have asserted, formerly Confederate used arms. Here is a photo of the “M” marking on one of these. The history of the Louisiana State Militia during Reconstruction is a fascinating story by itself, with Democrat and Republican partisans disputing control of the state or local governments, seating opposing candidates after crooked elections, and battles between well armed forces, even including artillery and Gatling guns. Ironically, in one of the major battles in downtown New Orleans, former Confederate General James Longstreet was leading the forces aligned with the Republicans, including the mostly black Louisiana State Militia, the Metropolitan Police and assorted carpetbaggers, against the “White League” forces composed of assorted Confederate veterans, former politicians angered that the corruption no longer lined their pockets, Democrats upset by corruption by the incumbents, and Klan supporters. But, I digress.

Although some makers sold arms to southern states before outbreak of hostilities, or perhaps finished delivery of items already under contract in the first month or two of the war, I know of no credible information that any maker sent complete arms or even parts south after that.

In summary, even though occasional dealers hoping to profit from a possible Confederate connection might still cling to a story that the Moore produced Enfields are somehow Confederate made or used, I do not believe that is true. The 1861 and 1862 examples are well documented by Moller and Reilly to have been federal purchases. The remaining guns, mostly 1863 dated were probably not federal purchases for regular issue, but rather purchased by states or private users (many units provided their own arms (for example, Henry rifles).

Hope that helps. If not, remember, all our free advice comes with a full money back guarantee. John Spangler




15734  - Unusual Radom Pistol Markings
2/6/2018
Carroll, Dacula, Ga. USA

Maker: F. B. Radom, Model: Vis 35 Pistol, Caliber: 9MM, Barrel Length: 4.5'', Finish: Blue, SN: L46 6 2

Markings:
None that I can locate. They are all German markings as far as I can tell.

Question:
I am trying to determine manufacture date by the serial number. The Serial number I listed above is odd. L46 space 6 two spaces 2 (L46 6 2). My question will I be able to determine manufacture date and location from this serial number?

Answer:
Carroll, I have never seen a Radom pistol with a serial number like yours, maybe the following information will help you to narrow the time frame of your pistol`s manufacture date:

Radom pistols were manufactured from 1935 through the end of WWII, first for the Polish military and then during Nazi occupation for the German military. Polish military pistols are the most valuable, they have a high quality blue finish and are marked with the Polish eagle. Some have a slot for a shoulder stock and tangent sights. Under German supervision the quality of finish on Radom pistols was decreased and features were eliminated to speed production. Collectors recognize three types of these pistols.

Type I pistols had all parts except the recoil spring and recoil spring guide blued with high quality commercial type blue finish. The barrel, recoil spring, and recoil spring guide were polished white. Grips were checkered hard rubber. A shoulder stock slot and a lanyard ring may or may not be present.

Type II pistols also had all parts except the barrel, recoil spring, and recoil spring guide blued, but the blue was over an improperly polished surface. The barrel, recoil spring, and recoil spring guide were polished white. Grips were checkered black plastic, checkered brown plastic, fine checkered hardwood, or coarse checkered hardwood. The lanyard ring and disassembly lever were retained but the shoulder stock slot was omitted.

Type III pistols had a Parkerized frame, slide, and magazine. The rear sight, hammer, hammer release, magazine release catch, slide stop, and grip screws were blued over an improperly polished surface. The barrel, recoil spring, and recoil spring guide were polished white. The lanyard ring was retained but the shoulder stock slot and disassembly lever were omitted. Grips were checkered black plastic, checkered brown plastic, fine checkered hardwood, coarse checkered hardwood, or grooved hardwood.

Hope this helps - Marc




15752  - Model 1943 Beretta?
2/3/2018
Ken

Maker: Beretta, Model: 1943, Caliber: 7.62, Barrel Length: 3'', Finish: Parkerized, SN: ?

Markings:
Nazi swastika over spread eagle stamped on receiver and slide. My dad won in a poker game in Germany in 1951.

Question:
Is this valuable or should I just keep it as a memory of my dad?

Answer:
Ken, there are some aspects of the information that you sent me which have me puzzled. The first is that I have never heard of a model 1943 Beretta and I don't think that there is such a thing. The Beretta models 1934 and 1935 were Italy's main service sidearms during W.W.II. The two models were basically the same except that Model 1934 was chambered for 9MM Corto (380) while the Model 1935 was chambered for 7.65 mm Brevettata (.32 Auto). Military Model 1934 pistols were marked on the left hand side of the slide "P. Beretta Cal 9 Corto - Mo 1934 Brevet Gardone VT" followed by the date of manufacture. The date of manufacture was marked in two systems (except on late wartime production models), the Christian calendar (1934) and a Roman numeral denoting the year of the Fascist calendar which began in 1922. Possibly you have the date of manufacture marking mixed up with the model number.

The second puzzlement is the Nazi marking that you mention. I have seen lots of eagle over a swastika markings but I can't ever remember seeing a swastika over an eagle.

The closest match to your description that I can come up with would be the German army accepted Model 1935 Beretta. The Axis Pistols book by Jan C. Still indicates that these pistols have the following characteristics :

  • Phosphate finish
  • Eagle over WaA162 or Eagle over Swastika over WaA162 located on the left grip tang
  • Left slide marked "P BERETTA - Cal 765 - Brevettata, Gardone V. T. 1944"
  • Metal backed plastic grips with PB emblem
  • Serial number on right frame and slide and sometimes on barrel lug

Where there is any family history, we encourage people to keep these old guns for sentimental value. Marc



15731  - Remington Lee Rifle Carried By A Marine
2/3/2018
Rozalyn , Fairmont, WV

Maker: Remington Arms, Model: USA# 2674WWK, Caliber: 45/70, Barrel Length: 30'', Finish: Blue, SN: 51831

Question:
This was my father`s Marine Rifle, Could you tell me what it`s worth

Answer:
Rozalyn- It takes a bit of work to figure out exactly what you have. We know from your description that it was made by Remington, and is in .45-70 caliber with a 30 inch barrel. The first likely candidate is the Remington-Keene bolt action rifle, but it had a 29.25 inch barrel, and the Navy (and their misguided children in the Marine Corps) only bought 250 of these, but they did have the WWK inspector marks. The total production of the Remington-Keene was only about 5,000 rifles, including military purchases, so the 51831 serial number rules this one out.

The other candidate is the Remington-Lee Model 1879, 1882 or 1885, and serial numbers on these went well above 51831 so this is probably what you have. However, the barrel length on the Model 1879 was only 29.25 inches, and on the 1882 and 1885 is 32 inches. I am guessing that you measured just the exposed part of the barrel, not the full length from the face of the closed bolt to the muzzle which would be about 32 inches. So, we will go with this one. Surviving records show several of these rifles in the 50,000 serial number range in use aboard ships circa 1895, so I think we are right on the ID.

The Navy did not usually allow arms to be taken home, so I suspect that the family history has become a bit twisted in telling over the years. I have no doubt your father served in the Marine Corps, and that he owned this rifle. However, it is more likely one that he purchased from a surplus dealer after leaving the service, so it was “his rifle” to be sure, but not necessarily the exact one he carried, even if it was the same model. However, these were out of service by about 1900, so your father would have been born in about 1880, and he must have lived a very long time, or you have celebrated your 29th birthday more than a few times if he carried one of these.

Value will vary greatly with condition, and any documented history which can link this rifle to your father, and details of his service. Average condition examples with no documented history seem to sell at around $1,000 or so retail. Hope that helps. John Spangler