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15902  - Dreyse Model 1907 Disassembly
10/9/2018
Mark, Fresno, CA

Maker: Dreyse, Model: 1907, Caliber: .32 ACP, Barrel Length: 3.6 inch, Finish: Blue, SN: 25111

Question:
What`s the best/easiest way to remove a barrel from this pistol? It twists and locks in, but is mostly covered by the barrel extension, so there`s no way to get any sort of grip on the outside of the barrel.

Answer:
Mark, Waffenfabrik von Dreyse was founded about 1842, they initially made the famous Needle Gun for the Prussian army, the Dreyse concern had also made needle pistols and cap lock revolvers. The Dreyse Model pistol 1907 was broadly based on the 1906 Browning pattern without the grip safety.

Model 1907 pistols are usually marked DREYSE RHEINMETALLABT SOMMERDA on the left side of the frame, with an 'RMF' monogram on the grips. Early models may be marked DREYSERHEINISCHEMETALLWAAREN-UND MASCHINENFABRIK ABT SOMMERDA, while a few made in 1914, after adoption of the Rheinmetall acronym, omitted 'Dreyse' completely. Many Dreyse pistols were purchased by police forces, including the Royal Saxon Gendarmerie.

I do not have much interest in Dreyse pistols so I can not give you any advise on disassembly from personal experience. Smith's book of Pistols and Revolvers has the following instructions:

Pushing the catch at the top of the rear of the receiver frees the barrel and slide assemblies and as a unit they can be hinged open. The barrel bushing must be pushed in around the barrel far enough to permit the slide to he disengaged from the mounting lug on top of the bushing. The recoil spring can then be eased out. Raising the slide about 30 degrees will about 30 degrees will permit it to be drawn forward out of the support forging.

Hope this helps. Marc




15893  - Engraved Civil War Era Colt Army Revolver
10/9/2018
Christopher, Fredericskburg, VA

Maker: Colt, Model: 1860 Army, Caliber: .44, Barrel Length: I Think 8 Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: 60036

Markings:
Wolf head Engraving on the hammer. Engravings all over the barrel , cylinder and handle.

Question:
I am trying to find out as much as I can about this firearm. All the S/N match across all pieces. It has a Colt Patent on the cylinder and the ''Address Col Sam...'' on the top of the barrel. I showed a collector named Udo (you may know him) and he informed me that there are no markings indicating that it was used in the military, implying commercial use. I was thinking it may have been engraved by Gustave Young because of the Wolfhead Hammer. This is not a replica and is in perfect firing condition. We were also thinking it could have possibly been used by the South in the Civil War since it was commercial, but did not know how to track that. Thank you, Chris

Answer:
Christopher- It certainly sounds like a nice gun. However, it is outside our area of expertise, and I could not authenticate the engraving as being original, or identify the engraver even if holding this gun in my hand while you held another to my head.

The starting point to research this one will be to pull out your wallet and credit card and contact Colt for a factory letter. Their prices for percussion revolvers, especially engraved ones, can get VERY pricey, so either man up and buy the letter, or take your chances that you might find out something for free elsewhere. But, the Colt letter should tell if it was delivered on a military order, or if on a civilian order, possibly if it was factory engraved, or shipped “in the white” for engraving by one of the big resellers, and possibly the shipping destination. If it authenticates this as a factory engraved gun, the cost of the letter will be well worth it. Hope you have a winner! John Spangler




15886  - REMINGTON 513T TRIGGER AND SAFETY ADJUSTMENT
10/6/2018
Joe, Missoula, MT, USA

Maker: Remington, Model: 513-T Matchmaster, Caliber: .22 Rimfire, Barrel Length: 26 Inches To The Firing Chamber, Finish: Blue, SN: 71573

Question:
How do I correctly mount and adjust the safety switch. How do I adjust the trigger pull weight, and the length of trigger travel.

Answer:
Joe- We are not gunsmiths and cannot give gunsmithing advice, especially related to the potentially deadly topics of safety or trigger adjustments. Here is a link to a copy of Remington’s instructions and scroll down to the parts diagram to see how they fit together. http://gnewyear.com/files/513T-2.pdf Here are some folks (who may be experts, or just Bubba’s beer drinking buddies who found a Wi-Fi connection) discussing trigger adjustments: https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=295461&highlight=513T+trigger+adjustment If you don’t feel confident about doing the work after reading those posts or others you find on line, we highly recommend you have a competent gunsmith do the work for you. It may cost a few dollars, but people get killed if safety or trigger problems allow a gun to discharge unintentionally. John Spangler



15901  - What`s It Worth
10/6/2018
Leroy, New Castle, PA, USA

Maker: Springfield Armory, Model: Model 1898, Caliber: 30/40 Krag, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: Blue, SN: 141863

Question:
What is its value

Answer:
Leroy, you did not give me much to go on. Without knowing the condition of your Krag, there is not allot that I can tell you. Value can range from $50 for a sporterized rifle in terrible condition with missing parts to well over $1000 for an example in good condition. Marc



15900  - Erma EM-1
10/2/2018
John, Northville, Michigan

Maker: Erma Werkes, Model: EM1, Caliber: .22, Barrel Length: 24 Inch, Finish: Blue, SN: 00141

Question:
When would this have been manufactured?

Answer:
John, Erma is an acronym for Erfurter Maschinen und Werkzeugfabrik, which was the firm’s original name. The company is well known for the submachine guns that they manufactured starting in the 1930s, including the famous MP38 and MP40.

The Erma EM-1 is a .22 LR, carbine which was styled after the US M1. The Erma rifles of this type that are based on the U.S. 30 Ml Carbine were developed in the late 1960s to satisfy requests from the U.S., but have since been marketed enthusiastically in Europe. Though they bear a close resemblance to their prototypes externally, they are quite different internally.

I do not have serial number information for this model but I can tell you that the EM-1 was introduced in 1966 and discontinued in about 1990. The EM-1 weighed 5.6 LBS, had an 18 inch barrel, adjustable aperture rear sights and came with a 10 or 15 round magazine. Marc




15879  - 1894 WINCHESTER PARTS
10/2/2018
MARK L. TEAGUE

Maker: WINCHESTER, Model: MODEL 94, Caliber: .30 .30, Barrel Length: 20 INCH, Finish: Blue, SN: 1492936

Markings:
MADE IN NEW HAVEN, CONN. U. S. OF AMERICA_WINCHESTER - MODEL 94-30 WCF - TRADEMARK

Question:
THIS RIFLE IS A 1936 CALVARY SADDLE RIFLE AND I’M MISSING THE FRONT AND REAR SLING MOUNTS AND THE SADDLE RING THAT MOUNTS ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE RECIEVER ABOVE THE AMMO LOADING PORT. CAN YOU HELP ME TEPLACE THESE PIECES ?

Answer:
Mark- In electronic communications, using ALL CAPS is considered to be “shouting” and impolite. But, we will quietly and patiently ignore that and answer anyway. You have the “saddle ring carbine” version of the Model 94 Winchester, and that would have had the ring on the left side of the receiver, but would not normally have had sling swivels, unless special ordered with them, so you really do not need both. Replacement rings and studs for the saddle ring are available from parts dealers, but we do not carry them.  One further correction, “cavalry” is the term for mounted soldiers. The name “Cavalry” is a geographic hill site with major religious significance. As far as I know, the Model 94 Winchesters were never used by any U.S. cavalry units, although a few thousand were used during WW1 by troops guarding the spruce forests and loggers working them to supply wood for airplane construction. John Spangler