Questions And Answers Page

If you have a question about firearms and you want it posted on this page click here.

Return to Collectors Headquarters.

Click here to go to the question and answer monthly index.

Click here to go to the question and answer subject index.


15797  - M1903 SPRINGFIELD MARK I
5/26/2018


Maker: Springfield, Model: 1903 MK1, Caliber: 30-06, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
According to your info....this gun was mfg. in 1919....The date on the barrel is 6-18. As you know this was made for a Pederson Device....which I don't think were made in 1919....??

Answer:
Sir- Very few of the M1903 Mark I rifles were actually assembled in 1918 due to ongoing tinkering by Pedersen on his design, so barrel dates could be a bit earlier than the usual 1-2-3 month lag between barrel dates and actual assembly. Many Mark I rifles have 1919 barrel dates, but some are also found with 1918 dates. There is also the chance that your rifle had the barrel changed during overhaul and a spare 1918 dated barrel from supply or salvage inventory was installed. John Spangler



15828  - Webley Target Model
5/26/2018
David Andover Minnesota

Maker: Webley, Model: W.S. Target, Caliber: 455, Barrel Length: 7 1/2 Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: 452710

Question:
What is it worth

Answer:
David, we have not had one of the Target Webleys for quite a while so I can not tell you a value from personal experience. I did a quick internet search and saw several selling in the $2000 range. Let us know if you decide to sell, you can contact us at the following link: http://oldguns.net/email/. Marc



15793  - KRAG RIFLE HISTORY
5/22/2018
Dave, Rimersburg, Pa.

Maker: Krag-Jorgensen, Model: 1896, Caliber: 30-40, Barrel Length: 30 Inch, Finish: Blue, SN: 61943

Markings:
I think cartouche says 1898

Question:
When it was made. And did it see combat. Or was used for training.

Answer:
Dave- Your Krag Model 1896 rifle was made in 1896, and almost certainly was used during the Spanish American War. However, we don’t know what unit it was assigned to, or if that unit remained in CONUS guarding Camp Swampy, or was on the front lines in Cuba, Puerto Rico or the Philippines. The few numbers near yours for which usage data survives shows some were used by Illinois or Iowa volunteer units or by regular Infantry, but without an exact match on the numbers it is impossible to be sure where the others went. John Spangler



15810  - Argentine Police HP
5/22/2018
Tim Edwards Imlay City, Mi. USA

Maker: Browning, Model: Police Prov.BS.Aires-61, Caliber: 9mm, Barrel Length: 4.5 Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: 05398

Markings:
It has a crest on the top if the slide by the rear sight and the same on the barrel. It has an ''E'' on the trigger guard and it has a tiger looking symbol standing up with the initials PW under it.

Question:
I do not believe this is an FN from what I have read. Its in good excellent condition. What year is it? and I'm looking to sell it. Approx. whet price range do they sell for? Pic`s can be sent.

Answer:
Tim, the Argentines contracted with FN to make the High Power under license. A number of Argentine made pistols have been imported for sale in the U.S. I would guess that this is one. It sounds as if this one was purchased by the Buenos Aires police authority.

I do not have any experience with Argentine High Power pistols but my guess is that value will be in the $350 to $450 range. Marc




15809  - Lignos 25
5/15/2018
Steve, Laty, Texas

Maker: AKT-GES Lignos, Model: Model 2, Caliber: 6.35, Barrel Length: Very Short, Finish: Blue, SN: 8894

Markings:
The markings on the pistol say, as best as I can determine: AKT-GES Lignos, Berlin Model 2 Cal. 6.35

Question:
Condition is at least VG, probably Excellent. The pistol was owned by my wife's great Aunt and was passed on to us upon her death. To our knowledge, it was fired exactly one time. and one round, which was accidental. I have not been able to find out much information about this pistol, and am curious on any general information about it, as well as a possible value. Also can you confirm that the cal. 6.35 is in fact .25 auto?

Answer:
Steve, in 1921, Lignose bought out Bergmann and its factory which was located in Suhl. The Bergmann Chylewski one-hand-cocking pistol was continued by Lignose as was the Bergmann Taschenpistole. The Taschenpistolen became Lignose models 2 and 3, while the Einhand became Lignose models 2A and 3A. Collector interest in Lignose pistols is low, the bluebook sets values for them between $50 and about $300. I would expect to see one in excellent condition offered at a gunshow in the $250 range. Marc



15791  - REMINGTON MODEL 10A SHOTGUN
5/15/2018
Bob, Burlington, Iowa

Maker: Remington, Model: 10A, Caliber: 12 Gauge, Barrel Length: 28'', Finish: Blue, SN: 171272

Markings:
The serial number is on the bottom of the receiver, just above the ejection port. Just above the serial number is the capital letter U. Stamped trademark just below the trigger guard reads ''Remington UMC.'' Barrel is marked full choke.

Question:
This has been in the family for years. Model 10A was a military weapon, but I cannot find information anywhere of a Model10A with a full choke 28 inch barrel. ''Remington Model 10A'' is marked on the barrel, along with various patent dates. Can you tell me anything about this Model 10A?

Answer:
The Remington Model 10 was made from 1908 to 1929, designed by John D. Pedersen and was Remington’s attempt to get a pump action shotgun to compete with the John M. Browning designed Winchester Model 1897 pump gun. Originally it was called the “Remington Repeating Shotgun” but became the Model 10 around 1910 when Remington got the rights to make John M. Browning’s semi-auto Model 11 repeating shotgun (also made in Belgium by FN as the Browning shotgun). Browning’s new business connection with Remington came about after Winchester had very foolishly rejected Browning’s request to be paid on a royalty basis per gun rather than selling his designs for a lump sum payment.

The markings you describe are all normal for the Remington Model 10. The vast majority of the Model 10 guns were sold for civilian use, although Roy Marcot’s “Remington -America's Oldest Gunmaker" states on page 171 -- "Model 10 Trench Shotgun - During the First World War, Remington Arms - Union Metallic Cartridge Co. manufactured 3,500 Remington Model 10 Pump-Action Shotguns with twenty-three-inch barrels and fitted with bayonet attachments and 1,150 standard Model 10R ("Riot" Grade) shotguns with twenty-inch barrels without bayonet attachments. The government used these guns primarily for guard purposes." The 10A designation does NOT mean it was a military purchased gun, and the U.S. and ordnance bomb markings were hand stamped on the left side of the receiver of those which were.

There is a lot of info on the Model 10 at the Remington site:

https://web.archive.org/web/20121121124516/http://www.remington.com/products/archived/shotguns/pump-action/model-10.aspx

There you will see that the Model 10 was made in several variations or grades: No. 1 or 10 A - Standard or Field Grade

No. 2 or 10 B - Special Grade

No. 3 or 10 C - Trap Grade

No. 3 Trap Special Grade

No. 4 or 10 D - Tournament Grade

No. 5 or 10 E - Expert Grade

No. 6 or 10 F - Premier Grade

No. 0 Riot Grade

Model 10 Trench Shotgun (World War 1)

Model 10 T – Target Grade which included grades D, E, and F as described above

The Remington Society of America has a copy of the actual Remington ledger information for serial numbers at https://www.remingtonsociety.org/factory-record-book-serials/ and this shows your serial number 171272 was made around September 1919.

So, you have a nice old gun, possibly with some sentimental value, but not a great collector prize. Note that this was a troublesome design and many have developed mechanical problems over the years and parts are not available, so it is probably a wall hanger, not a shooter. Hope that helps. John Spangler




15808  - Baby Browning Informaiton
5/12/2018
Tom Shelby, NC, USA

Maker: Browning, Model: Baby Browning, Caliber: 25, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
While cleaning out the contents of a house I inherited I came across two Baby Browning 25 cal pistols, which belonged to my late Father. In doing a web search I have determined that these guns are no longer manufactured. I also discovered that they are banned due to the gun control legislation. My question, do they have any value as collectors items and, if so what is the approximate value. Thanks.

Answer:
Tom, the Frabique National Baby Browning is a lighter, smaller version of the Browning Model 1906 Vest Pocket, without the grip safety or separate slide lock lever. The Baby Browning's frame is different than most other semi automatic pistols in that it reaches all the way to the front of the slide instead of stopping slightly short. The Baby Browning's longer frame results in a boxy appearance because the slide lower edge is straight from front to back, not stepped at the front like many other semi-automatic pistols. The Baby Browning's safety catch is a long lever running beneath the left grip, which end extends to, and is actuated just behind the trigger on the left hand side. Early models have the word 'Baby' molded into the lower portion of the grips, in addition to the usual FN monogram on the upper part. Pistols manufactured after 1945 omit the 'Baby' inscription, and those made for export to the United States have the word 'Browning' substituted for the FN monogram. Baby Browning pistols were imported under the Browning Arms Cooperation trademark from 1954 to 1970 when the implementation of new gun legislation in the United States made importation against the law. Records indicate that over 510,000 Baby Browning's were manufactured form 1931 to 1983. Values for Baby Browning pistols are in the $150 to $400 range depending upon markings and condition. Marc



15788  - FRANCH MAB MODEL D PISTOL
5/12/2018
Thomas

Maker: Mab, Model: D, Caliber: 32, Barrel Length: 4 Inch, Finish: Blue, SN: 76432

Markings:
Some markings and then 251 on the action and the barrel, also there are markings on both of what I think is an eagle.

Question:
How do you measure the index point.?? I want to replace the slide, I have found the parts but I need to know if the index point is .120 or .220. Thanks for all help. Thomas

Answer:
Thomas- First, I had to figure out what a MAB Model D pistol is, since I am mainly an olde rifle guy. I learned that MAB is for Manufacture des Arms Bayonne, located in the place after which both a nasty city in New Joisy and pointy things for rifles are named. There is a good history of all the MAB pistols at https://unblinkingeye.com/Guns/MABHist/mabhist.html and I am not going to attempt to summarize, anyone interested can go and read all they like. After several earlier models, the Model D in .32 ACP/7.65mm was made from 1933 to 1964 and then again from the late 1960s until 1982, so there are a lot of these out there. During German occupation of France in WW2, Model D production continued, roughly serial numbers 47,000 through 97,000 and these would normally have German Waffenamt inspection markings consisting of an eagle and swastika over WaA251. These are more desirable to collectors than those without the markings.

I finally figured out that you are asking about the “index point” and discovered that “refers to the small tab sticking out of the back of the barrel at the 12 o'clock position. Essentially, the earlier pistols barrels have a wider tab (.220" ) and the narrower tabs (.120" ) are found on later pistols. There is a matching hole inside the slide, just above the firing pin, that you can measure to see which your pistol had originally. The difference between .120" and .220" is large enough that there should be no confusion.” (From a Q&A on the Numrich page.

What I cannot figure out is why you would want to replace the slide, which would pretty much destroy the collector value. Note that Numrich does list both types in their catalog, and they are not marked as “out of stock” so you may be able to complete your project if you insist on going ahead.

When it comes time to take things apart and put them back together, here is a page with several videos on how to do it, and I don’t have a clue. Hope that helps. John Spangler




15807  - Brazilian Contract Model 1917 S&W Revolver
5/8/2018
Nathan

Maker: Smith & Wesson, Model: Unknown Revolver, Caliber: 45 ACP, Barrel Length: Five And A Half Inches, Finish: Blue, SN: ?

Markings:
¨ S&W D.A. 45¨ stamped on barrel, on the right frame side, stamped, is an ornate star encircled with leaves, pierced by a sword, a banner below that with the words ¨ ESTADOS UNICOS DOBRAZIL 15 de NOVEMBRA de 1889¨ and the date 1937 below that.

Question:
Info wanted identifying S&W D.A. 45 cal. I've come into possession of a Smith & Wesson 45 caliber revolver and I'm interested in learning more about this firearm. I will be grateful for any information.

Answer:
Nathan, it sounds like you have a Brazilian contract model 1917 S&W revolver. Handguns chambered for 45 ACP were desperately needed once the USA had entered the First World War. To meet wartime demands, both S&W and Colt modified their standard large caliber revolvers to chamber 45 ACP. The S&W Mod. 1917 was just a Second Model .44 Hand Ejector chambered in .45ACP, with the cylinder shortened to accept the special half-moon clips required for speedy ejection of spent .45 ACP casings. In 1937 S&W accepted an order from the Brazilian government for 25,000 Model 1917's. The Brazilian contract S&W Model 1917 revolvers which were stamped with the Brazilian seal on the side plate, were delivered in October of 1938. Marc



15796  - Revolver Used In Assassination Attempt On Tsar Alexander II In 1879
5/8/2018
Pyrin Russia

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
I am writing an article about the attempted Solovyov's assault on the Russian emperor Alexander II, 2 April 1879 year. He used a very large caliber revolver. His companion describes this weapon in this way: "The footman brought us a whole basket of revolvers. As a former amateur of weapons, childhood memories sparkled at the sight of such diversity. One of the revolvers - American - especially drew my attention with the huge trunks of his drum. They easily included my thumb."

I found only Britain revolver Tranter .69 cal. I have not found American revolver caliber more then .45. Help me please dear sirs!

Answer:
Pyrin- I do not know of any American made revolver of that period over .45 caliber. I believe the companion's description may be inaccurate, and that it was probably a .44 or .45 caliber revolver. John Spangler



15806  - HSC Identification
5/5/2018
Anders Welin Sweden

Maker: Mauser-Werke A:G Oberndorf A.N, Model: HS C, Caliber: 7.65, Barrel Length: Unknown, Finish: Blue, SN: 758.255

Markings:
On the right side of the trigger guard an eagle over the letter N. Very good condition.

Question:
Date of manufacture? What branch of the German armed forces used this? Value?

Answer:
Anders, Nazi HSC pistols were made from 1941 until the end of the war, serial numbers began at 700,000 and ended at 951,000. Pistols used by the German armed forces will have an Eagle over "WaA135" markings on the left side of the trigger guard where it meets the frame. This marking is the German WW-II Heerswaffenamt inspector's mark on arms produced at Mauser Werke AG, Oberndorf am Neckar, Germany. The Eagle over the letter N marking that you describe is a commercial test proof and it should be located in 3 places. 1- on the right side of the chamber (barrel), 2 - on the right side of the trigger guard, and 3 - on the right side of the slide near the muzzle. HSC's issued to the police have an eagle over an x inside a circle with the letter L to the right stamped on the left side of the trigger guard. If your HSC does not have Heerswaffenamt inspector's marks, it is doubtful that it is of military issue. Normal HSC values are in the $175 to $700 range depending on condition and markings. Values for special variations like Political Leader or Kreigsmarine pistols can be over $1000. Jan Still wrote an excellent book "Axis Pistols" full of good information on the amazing variety of handguns used by German forces, both German made and from over-run countries. Marc



15795  - BROWNING HIGH POWER STUCK IN CALIFORNIA
5/5/2018
Craig

Maker: Browning, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: 75C59XXX

Question:
Good afternoon. I am trying to settle a trust from a deceased uncle and we have a Browning 9mm serial number 75C59xxx We are trying to find the model number and possible value.

Presently the gun is with the San Francisco Police Dept because it was being kept in a safety deposit box out there, and when the box was opened they seized it. There was no criminal activity associated with it, just normal procedure. I am trying to determine if I should pursue getting it and selling it, but not sure how to go about that being I am not a gun permit holder. Any suggestions? I live in New York and I know all states have different protocol. Again, thank you so much for getting back to me.

Answer:
Craig- FN changed their serial number system several times, but the "C" following two digits was used from 1969 through 1975. The first two digits are the year of manufacture (1975 in your case) the "C" indicates the number is for the FN made Browning High Power 9mm semi automatic pistol, and then a sequential number starting at 1000 each year, so yours was the 58xxx pistol made that year.

These are well made and reliable guns made from about 1935 until production stopped around the end of 2017. There is some interest from collectors for guns in top condition, and from shooters for all others.

I would expect to find these selling in the range of $550-750 depending on condition. Look on Gunbroker.com and you can see one which sold recently for $655.00 and you can compare the condition of yours and adjust the price up or down accordingly. If the finish is nickel (silver color) or if it is heavily engraved, the value would be different.

But, talk about a double suck situation! Kalifornia has weird gun laws, as does New York (both state and city). The High Power was the first handgun to feature a "high capacity magazine which holds 13 rounds, and I believe is now illegal in both those backward states run by idiots. I am not a lawyer (thank God!) so this is not legal advice, but just my layman’s understanding of your situation.

IF (and a big IF) the hoplophobic bigots in San Francisco decided to release it to you (and not charge you with anything) the gun would have to be shipped to a FFL dealer in NY. You would then need to fill out the federal (and probably state) forms to pick it up, probably following a background check and waiting period. You would probably need to have NY pistol permit (not sure of the exact name) before you could even do that. And, with NY's "SAFE Act" I believe it is illegal with a 13 round magazine so they probably would not give it to you anyway, but I don't know if they would charge you with a crime.

Even if the SF cops are willing to release it, they may refuse to do so without a court order, so you may be looking at $$$$ for a lawyer to jump over that obstacle.

If you have a relative/heir who lives in a free state, it may be worth seeing if it can be delivered to them, avoiding all the potential hassles for a New York resident. Same shipment to FFL and filling out forms, but free states do not require "pistol permits" so it is a simple set of paperwork and a background check (takes about 5 minutes for a computer to check of all the lists of who has been naughty) and they can take it home. Another option might be to see if the SF cops will allow a local dealer/auctioneer to take possession to sell it. There are NO gun stores left in the city of San Francisco, they have run them all out of town.

Sadly, it may be that it is just too hard and/or expensive to get this gun freed from the clutches of bureaucrats who refuse to enforce many laws, and have their cities overrun with criminals who do not bother to obey any gun laws, or immigration laws. Apparently their the cops are busy disarming innocent civilians.

In my cynical opinion, if you surrender ownership to the SFPD, there is about equal chance that it will be melted down or fall off the truck and be taken home by some cop. As we learned from Dirty Harry, not all SFPD cops are honest. Good luck. Please let me know what you decide to do and how it turns out. John Spangler




15794  - M1903 Springfield Spare Parts Container
5/1/2018
Jon

Maker: ?, Model: ?, Caliber: ?, Barrel Length: ?, Finish: ?, SN: ?

Question:
Looking for wood butt stock spare parts holder for 1903 Springfield.

Answer:
Jon- Sorry, we cannot help with that one. I have only seen 4-5 real ones in my life, and all but one of those were in a stash of stuff from a former Springfield Armory employee. The late Ben Rice who made superb quality reproduction Krag handguards also made excellent reproductions of the spare parts containers, and those are about impossible to tell from original other than age, but even these are about 30 years old now.

For anyone wondering what the heck we are talking about, look on pages 437-438 of Brophy’s book. This is a cylindrical piece of wood, same size as the nickel plated oiler and thong case, with slots and holes to hold a spare firing pin, striker and extractor. This would fit in the butt of the rifle instead of the oiler and thong case, and were issued in a 50-50 ratio with the oilers from about 1911-1924. Originals, or even the repros are very scarce and bring pretty good money. John Spangler




15804  - Remington 11 DOM
5/1/2018
Gary, Hancock, MI, USA

Maker: Remington, Model: 11, Caliber: 20 Gauge, Barrel Length: 28'', Finish: Blue, SN: 1041732

Markings:
None

Question:
What is the date of manufacture?

Answer:
Gary, about 300,000 Remington Model 11s were made between 1911 and 1948. The design was based on the John M. Browning patents granted on the dates marked on the barrel, it was very similar to the Browning shotguns. Remington made these for U.S. sales under license from FN.

Remingtons manufactured in 1921 and after have a code, usually located on the left side of the barrel near the frame that identifies the year and month of manufacture. The Remington Society of America has a great page that gives information on Remington markings and dates.

If your shotgun does not have the code on the barrel, then it must have been manufactured between the year that the model was introduced (1911) and 1921. Hope that this helps. Marc